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Today's News

  • Shelby County Horse Show has new manager

    After more than two decades of managing the Shelby County Fair Horse Show, R.H. Bennett has stepped down, citing other commitments.

    “I'm the manager of the Shelbyville Horse Show, and I have stepped down from managing that,” he said. “I've got a conflict with other stuff going on. I've done it for the past twenty years or so.”

  • Collins set to take on Elliott County

    When the Collins boys’ basketball team takes the floor tomorrow night in the opening rounds of the KHSAA Sweet 16 State Tournament, it will primarily be focused on shutting down Elliott County’s backcourt, which features the team’s three primary scoring threats.

    The Lions sport a trifecta of scorers at the guard spots in Korbin Spencer, Chase Porter and Tanner Dickinson. The Lions run a relatively small lineup in its starters, something the Titans should be able to take advantage of with size in the paint.

  • Shelby splits road series

    The Shelby County baseball team earned its first win of the season Friday at Carroll County, thoroughly dominating the Panthers.

    Catcher Matthew Ellis was the star on offense for the Rockets (1-2), ending his night 3-4 at the plate with a whopping six RBIs and drawing a walk in the 19-1 blowout of Carroll (0-2).

    As a team, SCHS tallied 22 hits and scored 13 of its 19 runs in the fifth and final inning.

  • Trinity races past Collins

    Amidst some snowy playing conditions Monday night, the Collins baseball team took its first loss of the season to a talented Trinity squad in a five-inning, run-ruled 17-0 Shamrocks win.

    The second inning was particularly rough for the Titans (2-1), as the team surrendered 11 runs to the Shamrocks (2-0) in the top of the inning.

    Trinity rode a double and five singles during the half inning of play to a 15-0 lead after two.

  • Promotional scammers targeting businesses

    Reports are coming in from across the nation concerning a scam in which an Iowa-based organization, CW, or City Wide, Promotions, is contacting local businesses claiming to be working with or on behalf of the area chamber of commerce or school sports programs seeking advertisement for calendar booklets.

    It appears the scammers may now be targeting the Shelby County region.

  • Safely spring forward

     

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Calendar bill moves forward

    Due to a calendar conflict, the Shelby County Board of Education rescheduled their regularly planned Thursday meeting and convened instead on Tuesday for a special-called meeting.

  • Filing doesn’t have to be taxing

    With the confusion surrounding the possibility of delayed tax returns, tax-filing season got off to a rocky start.

    Nancy Kasey and Violeta Garner with Liberty Tax on Midland Trail in Shelbyville, confirmed that because the IRS issued a delay in releasing some refunds because of enhanced fraud protection with those claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credits (ACTC).

  • County gives easement to Kentucky Wired Project

    At its regular meeting Tuesday night, the Shelby County Fiscal Court granted a deed of for an easement to the Kentucky Wired Project.

    The easement is located at 401 Main St. at the Shelby County Judicial Center.

    The project, the first step toward moving Shelby County’s rural areas forward in terms of high speed Internet access, enables Shelby County to be included in the initiative, whose goal is to connect all 120 Kentucky counties with gigabit internet.

  • Small town with a lot of heart

    If you'd like to settle down with a good book, a soon-to-be published book detailing the history of one of Shelby County's smallest towns might be just what you're looking for.

    Cropper Reflections is a collection of stories and photos that tell the history of Cropper, located in the northeastern portion of the county.

    Author Mike Grimes, a resident of Cropper, said stories date back to the first settlers who came to this part of Kentucky in the 1780s.