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Today's News

  • Unique honor for unique field

    Frank Randall Childers, Jr., of Simpsonville, has received a rare and exalted honor in his field.

    Childers was recently awarded Diplomate status with the American Board of Forensic Examiners, an honor bestowed by the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute.

    And his area of expertise is just as uncommon as the achievement.

    “Most people think of CSI (Crime Scene Investigation) when they think of forensics,” Childers said.

  • Historic snowfall leaves county, state in emergency

    Shelby Countians awoke Thursday to horrific winter storm conditions, including impassable roads and more than a foot of heavy, wet snow that virtually paralyzed the county, with schools and government offices closed, as well as many businesses.

    Despite Herculean efforts by road crews, Shelby County roads were still in bad shape Thursday morning and into the afternoon, officials said.

  • Legislators continue to discuss heroin bills

    Heroin is not merely the fastest moving drug trend facing Kentucky – and Shelbyville – it’s the most deadly.

    With an average of two drug overdoses from heroin every week – and 8 dead so far this year alone – Shelby lawmakers say they hope that two pieces of legislation aimed at addressing the issue are passed this session.

    Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) said that both the Senate and House have passed their own version of heroin bills that take separate spins on the issue.

  • Crowd-sourcing a café

    A local restaurant is racing against time with only 12 more days to go in an effort to raise money.

    “We’re doing a crowd-funding campaign in order to get the proper commercial cooking equipment and upscale our catering business,” said Melinda Hardin, co-owner of the Harvest Coffee Café along with her husband, Ben.

    Crowd-funding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising monetary contributions from a large number of people, typically via the internet.

  • 1 book, 2 book, old book, new book

     

    This week, school children across the country have been throwing on their red and white striped thinking caps in honor of the late Dr. Seuss’s birthday and The National Education Association’s Read Across America Week.

    In its 18th year, the program is aimed at promoting the value of reading and encourages students with Seuss-based events, activities, projects, programs, and resources.

  • Several step down from Human Rights

     

    The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights provided its support through a resolution last month to include sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes to the Kentucky Civil Rights Act and the local commission wants nothing to do with it.

    Gary Walls, who has been the chairman of the Shelby County Human Rights Commission since it’s reincarnation in the last decade, said upon learning of the governing organization’s support through an email, he tendered his resignation.

  • Shelbyville City Council–Council sees benefits to restaurant tax

    In 2013 the Shelby County tourism commission proposed a 3 percent Restaurant Tax in Simpsonville, which city leaders adopted and have watched it flourish.

    After witnessing Simpsonville reap the benefits for 12 months, the Shelbyville City Council is now considering the tax, as well.

    Thursday, members of the Shelbyville City Council along with representatives from the Shelby County Tourism Commission participated in a workshop to discuss the proposed 3 percent Restaurant Tax for Shelbyville.

  • Historic downtown building under renovation

    A historic downtown building has been condemned, but that’s only a temporary condition, officials said.

    “It’s condemned right now because there were some [dead] pigeons and some glass and stuff falling out of it but those things have been remedied right now, and there’s a few other issues that have to be addressed before we take it out of condemnation,” said Barry Edington, code enforcement officer for the City of Shelbyville.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – District adjusts focus of digital conversion

    The district’s idea of 1:1 computing – which would put a digital device into the hands of every student – has taken a backseat to a new term. 

  • Home grown dinner

    About 15 curious Shelby County ladies were in attendance for a Plate it UP! workshop at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office Wednesday hoping to learn more about cooking with local produce.

    The free class was made possible through a partnership between the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences.

    The statewide program focuses on educating the community about locally grown foods and recipes that utilize them.