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Today's News

  • Teen hit by a car while skateboarding

    A local teen remains hospitalized after being hit by a car while skateboarding last Friday night, according to the Shelby County Sheriff's Office.

    Stefan Miller, 16, of Shelbyville, is still in intensive care at Kosair Children's Hospital after being struck by a car in the 100th block of Eminence Pike last Friday night at 10:17 p.m.

  • Snafu snarls bypass construction - Burks Branch stays closed to through traffic

    With his hands on his hips, Carl Henry snorted in frustration.

    "They're telling me now it will be closed until the middle of August, and if they come back and tell me it won't be open until December, I wouldn't be surprised," he said.

  • Scary

    There's a new piece of federal legislation that ought to give you a nice case of the heebee geebees, or at least the hives if you are allergic to fascism or have an intense reaction to having your privacy invaded.

    Senate Bill 1858, signed by President Bush on April 24, 2008 requires that all newborn babies in the United States have their DNA collected and cataloged. This is the first step in a genetic catalog of all U.S. citizens.

    The bill includes "that DNA shall be used for experimentation, cataloguing and categorizing."

    Are you squirming yet?

  • County's ag sector looks better all the time

    The old clich that you shouldn't put all of your eggs in the same basket looks like polished wisdom when it comes to the county's economic health.

    While many parts of the nation are reeling from job losses, depressed home prices and sluggish economic activity in general, Shelby County is doing better than most. Unemployment is higher than it has been for a while, home sales are slow here too, and retailers are feeling the pinch as consumers tighten their belts in response to higher gas prices. But at least one sector of the county's economy - agriculture -- is doing well.

  • Free dental clinic to open - Back to school screenings this Saturday

    A free dental clinic will open this Saturday with a back-to-school screening for children from low-income families.

    The clinic, which is run by Operation Care, will help address dental health, what many local leaders consider one of the most pressing issues in the community.

    Judy Roberts, executive director of Operation Care, said the clinic has been in the planning stages for over three years.

    She said the years of planning and preparation will pay off when the clinic starts helping the people in the community who daily suffer because of a lack of dental treatment.

  • Summer in the wild

    The difference between being lost in the woods and simply having an adventure often comes down to having the right equipment and the right training.

    The equipment can be bought easily enough, but the know-how has to be learned from a book or taught by people like local outdoorsmen Joe Franzen and Bryce Stella.

    During the school year, Franzen and Stella help their students at West Middle School get an education in the subjects such as world history and science, subject they most certainly will need to master to survive in high school and college.

  • Post 37 goes 2-2 in UK tournament

    American Legion Post 37 lost the first two games in the Big Blue Invitational tournament over the weekend but came back to take the second two.

    "There was all good competition in the tournament," coach Jim Wiley said. "We could have won all four or lost all four, but we should have won one more game."

    Post 37 lost to Next Level Baseball out of Louisville in the first game, 8-7. Wiley said the team "made some mistakes and they beat us in the last inning."

    The team also lost to Ashland, 8-5, in the second game.

  • Coleman's legacy remembered

    More than 200 people came to Calvary Cemetery in Shelbyville last Friday afternoon to honor the life of the Rev. Louis Coleman.

    Coleman, who died on July 5 of a seizure attack, was one of the loudest voices for equal rights here locally and across the state.

    Although Coleman was from Louisville, he led a church here locally and developed a love for Shelby County. Through decades of service in the community, he has left a legacy.

    Brenda Jackson, Shelby County School Board chair, said Coleman's dedication and service are an example to follow for future generations.

  • Community datebook

    Support groups

    July 17 -- Parents of Children with Learning Differences and Attention Difficulties meets at 7 p.m. at the Learning Disabilities Association of Kentucky, 2210 Goldsmith Ln., #118, Louisville. For additional information call the LDA office at 502-473-1256.

    July 24 -- Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder meets 7-8:30 p.m. at the Learning Disabilities Association of Kentucky, 2210 Goldsmith Lane, #118, Louisville. For additional information, call the LDA office at 502-473-1256.

    Public can attend

  • Appointment leads to battle (on court)

    At the fiscal court meeting Tuesday, magistrates appointed a new paramedic/administrative major to Emergency Services -- a position that has been surrounded by controversy over the hiring process.

    When the opening for the position was announced in May, two fiscal court magistrates, Cordy Armstrong and Allen Ruble, had allegedly stated at a public meeting that a particular employee be fired and another should be hired to provide funding for the deputy EMS director's position.