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Today's News

  • Mr. Basketball: Mike Casey

    Mike Casey wasn't born as an 8-year-old boy in Clark's Station, but that's where his story began. The gangly kid who rose faithfully at 6 a.m. to encourage a bleary-eyed neighbor to stop wasting their summer. The four-boy baseball and football games that started at daybreak and ended only when anxious mothers called through the darkness for their young athletes or explorers or cowboys in the Brush Run Valley along Highway 148.

  • Clark County slips past Rockets

    The Shelby County boys' basketball team blew a 16-point, third-quarter lead Saturday, falling, 61-59, to visiting Clark County.

    The Cardinals (12-3) rallied to take the lead after outscoring Shelby 27-10 in the third quarter.

    The Rockets (6-8) battled back, grabbing a 3-point lead, 59-56, with 1:20 to play. But Clark County wouldn't stop. Robbie Stenzel was fouled while shooting a 3-point shot and hit all three free throws to tie the score at 59.

  • LG&E, KU settles rate cases, typical bill to decrease

    The proposed rate changes that Kentucky Utilities filed last summer would've raised the average residential electricity bill by 7.3 percent.

    Now it looks like customers won't have to pay quite as much.

    A settlement announced Tuesday in the Louisville Gas and Electric/Kentucky Utilities Company rate cases would mean slightly higher rates for customers starting as soon as next month, but the rates would be a bit less than .

  • Trunk damage can girdle trees

    The farm looks like a storm hit recently, but it’s really just my husband’s new deer deterrent technique.  It seems to be working.

    In the past we have forgone the Irish Spring soap, human hair and coyote urine for more reliable barriers.  Tomato cages, tobacco stakes, wire, spiral plastic trunk wrap, and, yes, an occasional arrangement of lawn chairs have created distance between rutting and browsing deer. 

  • Dads, dogs and the unbending law of the universe

    “Don’t forget to change your oil.”  My dad gave me this pearl of wisdom more than once, often adding “You can drive your car without gas all you want, but don’t try to drive it without oil” to make sure I understood the importance of maintaining the car.

  • Remembering Mr. Basketball: Terry Davis

    When the banners are unveiled and the applause dies down, Terry Davis will again be remembered as Kentucky’s 1968 Mr. Basketball.

    “It’s nice to be remembered 41 years later,” he said. “Mr. Basketball gives you an identifying mark in this state. I don’t know how many times since then that I’ve been introduced as 1968’s Mr. Basketball.”

  • Looking Back: Jan. 16, 2009

     

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Coleman to receive posthumous

    The late Rev. Louis Coleman will be honored on Thursday as the 2009 recipient of the Martin Luther King Jr. Citizenship Award.

    The annual award ceremony will be hosted by the Martin Luther King Jr. State Commission at 4 p.m. at the Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort.

    The award is given to an individual within the Commonwealth of Kentucky who embodies the spirit and energy of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

  • SCHS changes cell phone policy

    Shelby County High School has changed its student cell-phone policy in order to tackle a growing problem of cellular usage during class.

    Though the policy change stops short of completely banning cellular devices, it does absolutely prohibit their usage during the school day.

  • 8 teachers pass National Boards

    Students aren’t the only ones who are glad when they pass a test.

    Last Thursday night the Shelby County School Board celebrated with eight local teachers who passed the National Board Certified Teachers exam this year.

    The exam, which is administered by the National Board Professional Teaching Standards, is a benchmark for excellence in education.

    Superintendent James Neihof said the teachers in the district who have passed the national board exam are “among some of the best we have.”