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Today's News

  • Shelbyville Police Report

    Drunken Driving

     

    Brenda Reece, 54, of Shelbyville, was arrested Oct. 29 on Boone Station Road and charged with DUI.

    William Shawn Fleming, 35, of Shelbyville, was arrested Nov. 1 on Henry Clay Street and charged with DUI and no insurance.

  • Happy retirement, Miss Mary

    I don't normally fret about writing columns, but this one has been tough. How, after all, do you adequately muster the words to pay fitting tribute to someone who has spent much of her life taking care of our most vulnerable children and their families?

    For more than a decade, Mary Simmons directed the Dorman Center, a special day care for at-risk children. If you had to make a list of some of life's toughest assignments, that job would be right near the top.

  • What we think

    Today we should thank Cary Vowels for his service to the City of Simpsonville.

    Vowels has been part of the Simpsonville City Commission for six years, and his contributions have been outstanding. His has been a voice both  reasonable and resonant, and his impact serious. For that he deserves thanks.

    But he also deserves congratulations for being a man of dignity and honor in perhaps his last contribution to the city.

  • Burks makes directorial debut

    "Over the River and Into the Woods," which opens at the Shelby County Community Theatre on Friday, is the directorial debut of Shelby County native Mark Burks.

    The play is about a young man, Nickey, who is adored by his grandparents. When Nickey gets a promotion, the prospect of his moving ignites a series of hilarious events.

    Michael Catapano, a teen new to the Shelby County Theatre, plays the part of Nickey. He is from New York and has a "great Italian-New York accent," Burks said.

  • Locals to attend Obama's inauguration

    When Barack Obama is inaugurated as the President of the United States in January, a group of Shelby County supporters will be there to cheer him on.

    The Shelbyville chapter of the NAACP is organizing a trip to attend the inauguration ceremony in Washington on Jan. 20.

    Local organizers are hoping that more than 50 people from the community will be there to "witness history in the making."

    Debra Jordan, president of the local NAACP, said the inauguration of the first African American president is one of the most historic events in her lifetime.

  • Plans for Simpsonville data center draw nearer

    An $80 million data center planned for Simpsonville has advanced another step with the passing of a first reading of an ordinance authorizing revenue bonds for the project.

  • Board tests new format

    It won't be business as usual at this Thursday night's school board meeting.

    The Shelby County School Board will test run a new format to their regularly scheduled meeting this week where they will spend additional time discussing issues coming before the board and less time voting ‘yeah’ or ‘nay.’

    Superintendent James Neihof said this “work session” format is designed to give board members and district personnel more time to discuss motions and ideas before making final decisions.

  • Election food drive inspires another

    A food drive held by two Shelby County teens during election week has proved to be very successful, according to Starla Martin, mother of Jacob Martin.

    “The food drive brought in 4,762 food items,” Martin said, adding that did not include a food collection box at W.J. Andriot's, located at 718 Main Street.

    Employees at that location said the box was not full but did contain a substantial amount of food.

  • Police still looking for suspect in death

    Police are still looking for the suspect in the death Monday of  a Shelby County man.

    The victim is James "Jim" Duckett, 43, a resident at 5300 Rockbridge Road in eastern Shelby County, which is where Kentucky State Police  said he died.

    A suspect is still at large, but police have found the victim's truck, which they believe the suspect used to flee.

    Police would not disclose the manner of death.

  • That was no endorsement

    The woman’s phone message was clear and strong and, as is the case with many of its ilk, absent of name, number or even e-mail address:

    “Your paper put an endorsement of Barack Obama on the front page. You should have put an endorsement of John McCain on the front page.”

    She didn’t elaborate. Her point and reasoning were understandable, and there was no problem with her vitriol.

    But her perceptions were more than a little hazy.