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Today's News

  • Community can help mold school culture

    Positive relationships.

    High expectations.

    Please become familiar with those two phrases, because they are the key ingredients to the perfect recipe for a high-achieving school.

    I do not claim to be a great cook. However, I can claim experience as a student who saw those traits in action - traits that as a student I didn't know what to call them other than I did know who exhibited them.

    Max Cox.

  • EARLIER: Helping Hand closes

    Shelby County Helping Hand has discontinued helping the needy in Shelby County.

    The charity, after 21 years of assistance with rent, utilities and food, is responding to the national economic downturn and current financial crush of many small business and charities.

    "We are no longer receiving [enough] funding from churches and businesses," Chairman, Sylvia Marshall said.

    Marshall said the donations available to disperse have decreased since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

  • Jail house rock solid in Shelby

    Staff photo by Lisa King

    Lt. Tony Aldridge watches as Deputy Jailer Darrell Cox manns the board in the control room at the Shelby County Detention Center.

    Jail house rock solid in Shelby

    Inmate numbers high; staff coping well

    By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

    Is the Shelby County Jail  overcrowded?

    Yes and no, according to jailer Bobby Waits.

  • What we think

     The civil lawsuit filed last week by a former student against former Shelby County High School teacher Scott Stumbo is the latest and most repulsive chapter in what has been an extremely ugly process for our local school district.

    Stumbo’s firing earlier this year after his prosecution on charges of sexual harassment of a student and distributing obscene material was distasteful enough.

  • An original agent of change in Shelby

     You probably watched Barack Obama win the presidential election last Tuesday night with thoughts of tearful admiration, disgusting disdain or just simple, palpable amazement.

    I was thinking of a guy named Delbert O’Bannon.

    For some of us, he was a long-ago agent of change who in a small and anonymous  way helped evolve a world in which Obama could be elected.

  • We congratulate

     Barack Obama’s significant policy statement Sunday on 60 Minutes is one that deserves our applause.

    He very firmly and directly let the public know that during this presidency, there needed to be significant movement on an issue that has stagnated many Americans.

    And, no, this had nothing to do with his focus on the economy, healthcare, education or leaving Iraq and disarming Iran.

  • Helping the helpers

    John Sherman Clark makes the bands that hold Dean's Milk containers together when they ship. He gets up in the morning excited to work, to contribute to society like thousands of others in the city.

    But what sets him apart are the obstacles he has to overcome to do it all. Clark has Down syndrome and lost his sight in 2003.

  • EARLIER: Serial arsonist arrested for setting 9 fires

    James Aaron Clark, 27, of Shelbyville, was arrested Wednesday on nine arson-related charges, after admitting that he set the fires as a way to relieve stress.

    Shelby County Sheriff's Detective Jason Rice said that Clark is charged with one count of first-degree arson, a felony that carries a penalty of 20 years to life, three counts of second-degree arson, also a felony, and seven counts of criminal mischief related to the fires in Shelby and Henry counties.

  • My Word: More Simpsonville memories

    I am delighted that Steve Doyle has returned to Shelby County to take the reins of our hometown paper.  It's always good for a community when one of its own assumes a prominent position from which to influence its future.  When you grow up in a place that you love, you want it to always remain just as good as you remembered, and if you have the inclination and the position you'll do what it takes to assure it.

  • Board to discuss redistricting plans

    Lora Floyd is still hoping her children won’t be sent to a different school next year.

    Floyd, who has a kindergartener and second-grader at Simpsonville Elementary School, is one of the 35 local parents who were notified last month that their child might be redistricted to Southside Elementary School because of overcrowding at Simpsonville.

    The proposed redistricting, which will effect close to 60 children, would take effect next school year.