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Today's News

  • An act of disrespect

    As I was reading the article in the June 4 edition of the Sentinel-News on the graduation ceremony of the class of 2008, the few sentences on the impromptu prayer led by one of the students caught my eye. This student said she did this because "we need God and we need prayer."

  • Ranch a haven for troubled kids, horses

    Gracie, Jake and Abraham may only sound like names given to horses, but at one local ranch these names represent joy and healing in the lives of children.

    Children are able to play and socialize with the horses, play games on the ranch's perimeters and eventually learn to ride the horses.

    At the ranch children are paired with rescued horses of varying breeds, many from neglected and abusive backgrounds, and almost all of the ranch's horses have been donated. Each new horse is given a new name, symbolizing a fresh start at life.

  • New Business: Hinkle's Glass and Windows

    Kevin Hinkle wouldn't walk over broken glass for his customers, but he will do just about anything else, he says.

    "Pretty much anything that involves glass, I can do," he said.

    Glass is his business, and he opened his own shop, Hinkle's Glass and Windows, on June 1 at 201 8th St.

    Hinkle, who lives in Shelbyville with his wife, Kelly, said he has more than 15 years experience in the glass business, acquired from working with his father-in-law, Bennie Dunn, of Lexington.

  • Wiley makes cut at Women's Public Links

    With a two-day score of 160, Candice Wiley was right on the cusp of making the cut at the Women's Public Links Tournament Tuesday.

    In fact, she was so close that she and seven other golfers were forced to play a play-off hole. The top seven of the eight would make the cut.

    "I knew it would be close when I finished my round," she said. "I kept sitting there hitting (refresh) on the computer to see the scores. Finally, I said 'Mom, we have to go back to the golf course.' When we got there they were still playing, and I was bouncing back and forth between in and out."

  • School officials concerned over grad rates

    Out of the 177 school districts in the state, Shelby County ranked near the bottom of the barrel for graduation rates for the 2006-07 school year.

    According to data released by the Kentucky Department of Education, Shelby County's graduation rates lagged behind the rest of the state by close to 3 percent. The district's graduation rate of 80.99 percent gave them the 29th worst rating in the state.

  • Free soybean meal to go to farmers

    It's not too often that folks can get something free with no strings attached, but next week, local farmers will be treated to just that.

    Soybean meal -- 50 tons of it -- was spilled during a Norfolk Southern train derailment near Waddy in March. That accident happened at about 3 a.m. on a Sunday morning, when nine cars jumped the track and overturned. Four of them were hopper cars loaded with the meal. Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger elected to have the meal taken into storage for farmers rather than have it taken to a landfill for disposal.

  • Foreclosures: 'Needlessly on the rise'

    Yolanda Bradford knows painfully too well the look on homeowners' faces when they are facing foreclosure.

    Bradford, a non-profit financial consultant, said people who come into her office with a stack of late mortgage payments often don't have any hope of saving their home.

    "They think there is no way to save their home, so many just walk away and let their house fall into foreclosure," she said.

    Bradford has seen the number of homeowners who walk away without first pursuing all of their options steadily increase in Shelby County.

  • 1968: J.L. Coots and son Jack hit the top with Guernseys

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

    10 years ago, 1998

  • Jackson to help review CATS test

    A member of the Shelby County Board of Education has been appointed to a task force that will scrutinize the state's testing system.

    Brenda Jackson, the current school board chairperson, is one of 22 state education, legislative, and civic leaders who have been charged with the task of reviewing the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System (CATS) and giving recommendations for improvements.

  • Scenes from the 2008 Shelby County Fair