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Today's News

  • Local students’ paintings to be sold to feed hungry

      Students in Amanda Dungan’s third-grade class have spent the last few weeks learning about the costs and benefits of creating art.

    Dungan and fellow Southside Elementary School teacher Krista Armes combined lessons on economics and painting in order to create an engaging learning experience for their students.

    This classroom activity had additional significance for the students because after the paintings are completed, they would be sold, and the proceeds would help provide food for needy children in the community.

  • Her final chapter is written

    When she first was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2005, Toni Ethington Roberts said she did what many of us would do: She went to the bookstores for help.

    She read and read, but none of the most popular self-help books seemed to shed light on the long, dark tunnel into which she was staring, so she said she decided to do something most people can’t do: She wrote her own story.

  • Simpsonville residents to review new concepts

     Residents of Simpsonville will convene again Monday to see what a consulting company has done with their input on a plan to build a downtown district for the city.

    A few dozen residents and city officials brainstormed in February with HTNB, a consulting firm from Louisville, to come up with an outline for a plan for the Simpsonville of the future.

    HTNB will report back Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 in the Simpsonville Gym, and residents are invited to help narrow that original list of ideas and set next steps for the project.

  • EARLIER: Shelby swimmers ready for Sectional

    Four members of the Shelby Sharks are looking to hit peak speed this week.

    “We just want to go fast,” said Amanda Skinner, Lindsey Anderson, Collin Kessinger and Addison Barlow.

    The four girls are warming up for the biggest meet of their lives. The team will come together to race in the 400-medley relay, and Skinner will also compete in the 100 and 200 breast and the 100 fly at the Southern Zone Eastern Section meet at Cary, N.C., this week.

  • Fear sometimes can separate you from the right stuff

    You have read the chilling accounts about that teen-aged boy who was shot dead just a block from the library recently.

    You probably didn’t know the victim. You may have heard the chatter about why this might have happened. You probably know even less about the alleged shooter or his whereabouts.

    But at least one of us can speak clearly about what must be the shock and sadness that those who live around that street must feel each day as they pass the spot by the tree where they saw Joel Mena breathing his final breaths. One of us understands.

  • Local minister indicted on sodomy, pornogaphy charges

       A Shelbyville minister who has been incarcerated since the first week of January on sexual-related offenses now has been indicted on additional charges.

    In addition to four counts of third-degree sodomy on a juvenile, first-degree sexual abuse, and first-degree wanton endangerment, James H. Bell, 47, former pastor of Refuge Temple Church of God in Christ, has been charged with distribution of obscene material to a minor.

  • EARLIER: Casey to join Kentucky's Hall of Fame

    Shelby County basketball legend Mike Casey is headed to Kentucky’s Athletic Hall of Fame.

    Casey, who in 1966 led Shelby County to its first basketball championship before going on to star at the University of Kentucky, will be inducted along with seven others on April 29 in Louisville.

    Casey, a native of Simpsonville, is continuing to battle health problems and was unavailable for comment. He first learned of his selection late last year and indicated then that he was extremely honored to be part of this shrine.

  • Shelbyville takes stand against non-stormwater discharges

    With the second reading approval of an ordinance Thursday, the city of Shelbyville has taken a stiffer stance against non-stormwater discharges.

    In general, the ordinance prohibits discharges of "substances that, either by their chemical makeup or by the quantity of it, just don't belong out on the surface of the ground, or in the streams, or in the storm sewer system," engineer Kerry Magan said.

    This ordinance has four objectives:

  • Boards may get more members

    Two boards of appointed Shelbyville leaders may soon need to pull up a few extra seats.

    Separate ordinances were brought before the Shelbyville City Council on Thursday, one calling to increase the number of code enforcement board members from three to five, and the other to bump the Historic District Commission from five to seven members.

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said the same reasoning justifies increasing the size of both groups.

  • Tapp: Adoption bill's chances 'slim'

     Senate Bill 68, a measure that would prohibit unmarried couples from becoming adoptive or foster parents, is running out of time to make it through this session of the legislature, said the bill's sponsor, state Sen. Gary Tapp.

    “The chances of it going anywhere in the House are slim,” Tapp said. “It's just a little late in the session.”

    Tapp said the bill would have strong support in both houses of the legislature if it could make it to the floor for a vote in both chambers.