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Today's News

  • Martinrea still open despite rumors of shutting down

    Despite a number of significant cutbacks and rumors that the plant could shut down, Martinrea is continuing to hang in there, at least for now.

    Sources inside the plant, who asked for anonymity because of the volatility of the employment situation, say they have heard the plant is going to close its doors soon, but so far, that has not come to pass.

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping, located at 1000 Old Brunerstown Road, currently has 400 employees.

  • New Business: Hadawreck Body Shop

    Hadawreck Body Shop is owned and operated by Tim and Michele Lily.

    The Lilys have been residents of Waddy for 14 years, where they live with their three children.

  • Looking Back: March 20, 2009

     Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Shelbyville Police Reports March 20, 2009

    DUIs  

    Figueroa Mercel Millan, 64, of Shelbyville was arrested March 11 on South 10th Street and charged with DUI first offense, no operator's license, resisting arrest and no insurance.

    Kimberly A. Nichols, 36, of Shepherdsville was arrested Saturday on Taylorsville Road and charged with DUI.

    Sergio Juarez, 38, of Shelbyville was arrested Sunday at Midland Trail and Robin Road and charged with DUI, failure to illuminate headlights and no operator's license.

  • Look for Slaughter, WKU to rekindle magic

    When former SCHS star and current Western Kentucky University guard A.J. Slaughter put up 25 points and grabbed nine rebounds in a 68-54 victory against the University of Louisville in December, the basketball world took notice.

    It seems, however, that many had forgotten about the ‘Toppers.

    If WKU didn’t win the Sunbelt Conference Tournament, some thought they might not make the NCAA Tournament.

    Now that the Hilltoppers are firmly in the field of 65, some may think their 1-year wonder has passed.

  • New coach, new Lady Rocket track team

    The Shelby County girls’ track team is undergoing change with a new coach.

    Marcus Henderson brings different routines, techniques and expectations, and he also brings a world of credentials.

  • Pitching key as Rockets take field

    Anytime you lose 80 percent of your innings pitched, people are going to question your pitching staff.

    “That’s where we have the most questions right now,” SCHS Coach Bart Roettger said. “We lost a lot of guys, but we do have several guys coming back with experience.”

    After his team played 23 teams ranked at some point last year and was shocked by Henry County in the first round of the region tournament, Roettger said he and his team have learned from his first season.

  • County approves rural secondary road program

    Magistrates approved the  2009 Rural Secondary Road Program at its regular meeting on Tuesday.

    The program calls for the re-paving of two roads, Ky. 2867 (Kings Highway) and Ky. 1848 (Todd's Point Road).

    Matt Bullock, chief engineer for the District 5 Region, told Shelby County Fiscal Court members that

    these two roads were chosen because of their run-down condition.

    “These are two of the roughest roads in Shelby County,” he said.

  • EARLIER: County landfill will not accept dead animals

    Farmers with dead livestock on their hands will not be able to get rid of them by sending them to the convenience center in Waddy.

    The 109 (solid waste) Board voted Monday no longer to accept dead livestock at its facility on Kings Highway near Waddy. Citing costs to the county and uncertainty about how to deal with potentially diseased animals, the board voted unanimously to bar farmers from bringing in dead livestock.

    “I just don't think we should go there,” board chair Don Cubert said.

  • What we think: CATS may go but need remains

    The General Assembly’s passage last week of a bill that would eliminate the CATS test merits further consideration before being signed into law.

    In fact this step, and its effects on the well being of our students, deserves, well, more study.

    There is little doubt that the CATS test – as with most education achievement tests – is flawed. Parents complain that it puts too much pressure on students to perform on one test. Educators complain that it forces them to teach to a test rather than a base of knowledge.