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Today's News

  • Rockets top Henry County in region semis

  • Fired Up

      Some of his friends smile when they hear his name mentioned. Some call him a character.

    But whatever you call him, when you call him to come through for his community, he will be there.

    Elmer Brown, former Waddy fire chief, is still a familiar face around the firehouse. He has been a volunteer firefighter at Waddy since 1975, with a 2-year stint as chief in the 1980s.

    “It gets in your blood,” he said, with a crooked grin for which he is famous far beyond the fringes of Waddy.

  • City Council approves moratorium in Shelbyville

    Shelbyville City Council has approved an ordinance declaring a building and zoning moratorium on the east end of Shelbyville.

  • Sharks wrap short-course season at state

    The Shelby Sharks swim team sent 19 individuals to the 13-and-over United States Swimming Kentucky State Championship this past weekend in Lexington.

    Competing at the University of Kentucky’s Lancaster Aquatic Center, the Sharks came out firing, posting best times in 32 events.

    Amanda Skinner, Addison Barlow and Collin Kessinger all qualified for finals.

    “We had a great weekend and it was nice to see the individuals that are learning the value of hard work and dedication do well,” Sharks Coach Jeremiah Heath said.

  • New test could replace CATS

    While Shelby County School officials are waiting for the governor to sign a bill that would eliminate CATS testing, they say they will continue do things the way they have been.

    “Should the governor choose to sign the bill into law, KDE will develop policies and practices that follow the “spirit of the law,” said Kerry Fanine, assistant superintendent, student achievement division of Shelby County Schools. “Only at that time can the district begin to advise our stakeholders on how we will proceed with educational policy and practice.”

  • SCHS soccer player going Division I

    The culmination of a dream and years of hard work came together for Bradley Shuck on Tuesday afternoon in the SCHS cafeteria.

    Shuck, a senior leader and defenseman for the Rockets' soccer team, signed his letter-of-intent to play soccer at Belmont University in Nashville.

    “This is what Bradley’s been working for, and it’s an amazing accomplishment,” SCHS Coach B.J. Andriot said. “All his hard work, the camps, the travel, it’s all paid off.”

  • Our Lady student to compete in state contest

    An 8th-grade student at Our Lady of Guadalupe Academy in Simpsonville is set to compete in a statewide geographic contest next month.

    Maria Cozzens has been notified by the National Geographic Society that she is one of the semifinalists who have been selected to compete in the 2009 Kentucky Geographic Bee, sponsored by Google and Plum Creek.

    Bees were held with 4th-through 8th-grade students throughout the state to determine each school's geographic bee winner.

  • Shipley named principal at Painted Stone

     

    The job won't officially be hers until July 1, but that isn't stopping Michelle Shipley from forging right ahead as the new principal at Painted Stone Elementary.

    Shipley, who has severed several months serving as that school's interim principal, this week was given the job permanently by the school's Site-Based Decision Making Council.

    Shipley said she already has drafted a letter to parents sharing her excitement and goals for the school and its students.

  • Shelbyville approves moratorium on east end of downtown

    In a special called meeting Tuesday, Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance declaring a moratorium on the east end of Shelbyville from Fourth Street to the Mt. Eden Road, also including the initial burst of Frankfort Road, where the Hilltop Produce property is located.

    The moratorium will become effective pending the approval of its second reading, held Thursday, and would encompass all building permits, demolition permits, zoning map amendments, planned unit developments, and development plans within the area.

  • Ray Moss Tucker family quits dairy business

     Cow No. 464 ambled into the milking parlor, hung her head and quietly submitted to the ritual of teat spraying, udder attachment and plink, plink, plink of the milking machine that will drain her of several gallons of milk.

    It's a  ritual that will be repeated for 49 of her black-and-white Holstein herd mates twice a day, 365 days a year.