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Today's News

  • Bearcats top Rockets for district title

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  • County updates building inspection codes

    Shelby County is about to move more deeply into inspecting commercial buildings.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court approved Tuesday the first reading of an ordinance to update the codebook for building inspections and allow county inspectors to evaluate those buildings. In the past, state inspectors were called in.

    Tony Kelley, Shelby County Level 1 Building Inspector, said that he recently has been certified to do commercial building inspections as well as residential but that the county's code book had to be updated to allow him to do so.

  • Sharks cranking out records

    The Shelby Sharks swim team completed the first two long-course meets of the summer season with outstanding results.

    The Sharks set 17 team records and added 30 Long Course State qualifying times.

    Coach Jeremiah Heath praised his team's work ethic.

    "Some of the best accomplishments I'm seeing right now are the desire to do better and the understanding of how to become better," he said.

  • Scouting abroad

    For most kids there are few things more exciting than tearing open presents and seeing what surprises they receive.

    But the junior girl scouts of Troop 2146 know exactly what they want next year: Eiffel Towers and authentic Swiss chocolate.

    These six girls, along with their mothers, have been invited through the Kentuckiana Girl Scout Council to spend 10 days next summer sightseeing in London, Paris, and Switzerland. A 2-day extension to Rome is also a possibility.

  • Girls ready for No. 1

    The SCHS softball team isn't too worried about facing No. 1 Christian County in the opening round of the State Softball Tournament this morning at Owensboro.

    "We get number one in the first round, so if we beat them, we'll just breeze through," senior Haleigh LeCompte said jokingly

    The girls know that the tournament is full of top teams, especially in their half of the bracket, in which seven of the eight are in the top 30. But even with No. 1 and all the other top teams, the Lady Rockets' focus won't change.

  • We congratulate: Mr. Andriot's latest venture

     

    He has taken another historic building that for years housed The Armstrong Agency and turned it into what he hopes will be an upscale Tuscan/Mediterranean eatery, called The Bell House.

    And we like that idea quite a lot.

    Shelbyville needs a continued insurgence of energy, and Mr. Andriot – as with his brother, Bill, and his father, William – long have provided power to new looks and new initiatives that have improved our county seat. Mr. Andriot has led many parades, and this new one could strike a wonderful chord for our future.

  • SCHS football team shaking off rust with summer work

    The SCHS football team is trying to shake off a little rust while getting ready for the season.

    This past  weekend the Rockets traveled to the University of Louisville for the team's first passing tournament of the summer and started that process of getting the parts in tune.

    The U of L tournament consisted of 10 pools of four teams each. Each team played three pool games, and if a team finished undefeated, it advanced to tournament play.

  • New farmland preservation group formed

    With the state's Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easements (PACE) at a standstill, a local group is starting a farmland preservation effort aimed exclusively at Shelby County.

    Shelby Area Rural Conservation (SARC) is a non-profit organization that hopes to leverage local dollars with federal programs to save farmland. Jim Ellis, president of SARC, said the organization hopes to tap into federal money under the Farmland and Ranch Protection Program that matches locally raised funds to buy easements that will preserve farmland forever.

  • New beginnings in Bagdad

    Flies soared through the ash, bathing in the scent of moldy debris and decaying food that has been trapped in powerless refrigerators for a month.

    "If the smell gets in your clothes, Febreze helps," Susan Payne said as she carefully navigated through the debris of what was once her farmhouse on Beard Road in Bagdad.

  • Our roads are well traveled but our lessons are not well learned

    That could have been you or me, you know.

    That tragically dead teenager lying on a piece of farm land along one of Shelby County’s tight and treacherous roads could just as easily have been one of us.

    Maybe you knew and today mourn Samantha Mathus-Cooper. Maybe you knew someone else who was driving or riding our roads one night and simply never made it home.

    Or maybe it’s a bit of both.

    These tragedies never leave us, and yet they never really do justice to the person who gave a life, either.