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Today's News

  • Flags raised in remembrance of prisoners of war, missing in action

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet  joined veterans from across the commonwealth Wednesday to help preserve the memory of American men and women lost during foreign combat.

    Flags to honor the nation's prisoners of war and missing in action were raised at 24 rest areas and welcome centers throughout the state.

  • Recession not chewing up restaurants

    People still seem to be making their way to restaurants to eat, just maybe not with the same appetites.

    “They [the restaurants] all seem to be doing well,” Shelby Development Corporation Director Eileen Collins said. “I think everybody has been hit by the recession, but I think everyone is holding their own.”

    Many Shelbyville restaurants say they are hanging on the same way their customers are -- with careful money management.

  • Legendary Shelby Countian Mike Casey passes away

     Mike Casey, one of Shelby County’s most famous citizens, died Thursday after a long battle with heart disease. He was 60.

  • Small fish, big splash

    To say that the locally produced independent film "Clancy" did well in its opening weekend would be putting it lightly.

    "It did extremely well. We were having to turn people away Friday and Saturday night because it was packed," said Melanie Scott, assistant manager of the Apex Village 8 Theater in Louisville. "This has been one of our biggest openings in a long time."

  • Why doesn’t Easter get the respect it deserves?

    I was singing that beloved Easter ditty “Here Comes Peter Cottontail” to my 2-year-old daughter the other day. She thought it was just great, especially when I inserted her and her brother’s names into the lyrics, and she sang along in much better key than mine.

    As I listened to her, I realized that this was one of the few Easter songs I even knew. We had to repeat it to keep going. There was no Bing Crosby CD to mimic. This was it for a 2-year-old.

  • Thieves make off with thousands

    Thieves took an area convenience store for thousands of dollars on Wednesday, police say.

    Maj. Danny Goodwin with the Shelbyville Police Department said five or six Hispanic males were involved in the scheme.

    The group cashed several fake payroll checks at the Convenient Food Mart on U.S. 60, checks that police say were made out to look like they came from area businesses.

    They looked real, but they had the wrong date and some misspellings as well. The suspects also used fake I.D.s to cash them.

  • Zoning board won't meet three months in 09

    The Triple S Commission's decision to reduce the number of meetings it will have for the remainder of the year was not met with open arms by local surveyors and engineers Tuesday night.

    Members of the commission approved an amendment to the Commission Bylaws, Article V, Sections 1 and 4 that requires the commission to meet at least six times a year, and adopted a revised calendar for the rest of this year.

  • SCHS girls struggle at Apollo tourney

    After her team's 1-2 trip to the round-robin tournament at Owensboro Apollo last weekend, SCHS softball Coach Kelly Cable is at a loss.

    The Lady Rockets started the season 4-0 but now have lost three of their last four, scoring just two runs in the three losses combined.

    “I can’t figure it out,” Cable said. “I know the talent is here, and I know what these girls are capable of, but I can’t figure out how to get it out of them.”

  • EARLIER: Martinrea says union rejects proposal

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping officials said in a statement Tuesday that union workers have rejected proposals by plant officials.

    Employees had voted in early March to reopen negotiations to try to reach a more competitive collective bargaining agreement as a step to save the struggling plant.

    Martinrea, which supplies the auto industry, primarily Ford sport-utility vehicles, has been struggling with the downturn of the economy.

  • PART IV: A Japanese counterattack slows advances

     A day or two after we landed on Guam, at about 11:30 p.m. on July 25, 1944, those of us at the Command Post that had been established at the base of the steep cliff near the beaches, heard a cacophony of machine-gun fire and explosive bursts coming from the top of the cliff.