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Today's News

  • EARLIER: Shelbyville Bypass is a year away

    Construction of the Shelbyville Bypass, expected to be completed sometime this fall, will require at least one more year before it will open to the public.

    Work resumed on the roadway last week, but Department of Transportation officials, who said in April that the road could be opened this fall, admit now that workers will need to work into 2010 to finish this 4.5-mile, $26 million-dollar project.

  • New Shelby store to be called Goody's

    Shelbyville’s new store is going to have an old name: Goody’s.

    That new retail outlet Stage Stores is opening next month will carry the Goody’s name.

    Stage obtained the Goody’s chain July 3 and decided to trade on that store’s popularity among shoppers in Shelby County. Originally the plan had been to open a Peebles store here on Aug. 20.

  • News Briefs: July 31, 2009

     Miss KSU to speak

    at event Saturday

    Elisabeth Martin, Miss Kentucky State University, will be the guest speaker for a Back to School Event at Clay Street Baptist Church on Saturday at 11 a.m. The event is sponsored by the Shelbyville/Eminence KSU Alumni Chapter.

  • Flooded roads reopen

    County Road Supervisor Carl Henry has just announced that all roads in the county that had been closed because of flooding are now reopened.

    Since 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Scott Station Road, Antioch Road and Anderson Lane between Shelbyville and Simpsonville had been closed because of significant water flowing from Bullskin Creek.

  • Residents share their vision for East End

    Some Shelby County residents already know what’s going to be in the headlines in 20 years. They got to write them.

    About 30 government officials, business owners and community members participated in exercises at a public workshop on Tuesday meant to get them thinking about the future of Shelbyville’s East End.

    The meeting at the Stratton Community Center was the first step in the East End Study, a small area plan by the City of Shelbyville and the Triple S Planning Commission.

  • Man dies while driving on Taylorsville Road

    Man dies while driving on Taylorsville Road Coroner suspects cardiac arrest   By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer  

    A Spencer County man died Wednesday in Shelby County apparently while driving, police say.

    Shelby County Sheriff's Detective Jason Rice said that Brandon Surma, 38, of Taylorsville was found at about 8 p.m. Wednesday in his car in a soybean field at 3248 Taylorsville Road.

    "The property owner noticed a vehicle in his soybean field, well off the roadway," Rice said.

  • Info needed on burglary

    Crime Stoppers is seeking information about a burglary that happened sometime last week.

    The crime happened in the 100 block of 8th Street while the resident was away on a trip. The resident was gone from July 18 until July 23, when he/she returned at 10:30 p.m. to find the front door damaged and not secured.

    Several items were taken from the home, including a large quantity of DVDs, CDs, all of which were marked with the victim's name in permanent marker.

  • News briefs: July 24, 2009

      

    KACo board changes spending practices

    The Board of Directors of the Kentucky Association of Counties announced Thursday that, effective immediately, credit cards will no longer be used by KACo.

    That organization and the Kentucky League of Cities have been under fire since June when an investigation by The Herald-Leader in Lexington found questionable spending by the organizations and their officers. 

  • EARLIER: 13-year-olds win District

    Scott County got a whipping – twice – from Shelby County’s 13-year-old team in the Babe Ruth League District Tournament this past weekend.

    Shelby County pounded  Scott County, 16-1, on Friday and took the tournament title with a victory  over the same team, 20-7, in the championship round Saturday.

  • EARLIER: Horse Show: 20 years old and still growing

    At the first Shelbyville Horse Show, in 1989, volunteers would scurry home each night and cook casseroles, bake brownies and arrange meat trays for the next day's show.

    The first show was run from an 8-foot table and chair by one person – Beth Snider, who operated out of a rented hall. Sons and husbands of volunteers served as bartenders. Most of the horses, trainers and riders were locals.