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Today's News

  • EARLIER: Bypass construction stalled by weather

    Construction on the Shelbyville Bypass has all but come to a standstill, and state officials say it's because the county had such a rainy spring.

    "It's been raining, and even when it stops, they've got to wait for the ground to dry out," said Andrea Clifford, public information officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

  • EARLIER: First day at new school just another challenge for Patterson

    Seventeen-year-old Brittany Patterson has moved to Finchville to be with family and become a senior at Shelby County High School. Like any teen in that situation, she's nervous. She won't know anybody at school and isn't familiar with the facility. She's the new kid.

    But the adventure is also one Patterson is eager to embark. After all, she has spent her life facing challenges that most teens never could imagine.

  • Shelby Industries launches new Web site

    Shelby Industries, an established company dating back to 1982, has launched a new Web site that will help customers take advantage of new products and services.

    During the past 18 months, Shelby Industries has expanded into new markets by promoting services in metal stamping, custom metal fabrication, welding, zinc plating, engineering services, construction products, logistic services and subassemblies.

  • Meeting with contractors set for Friday

    State officials and the contractors for the Shelbyville Bypass will meet this morning in Frankfort to discuss the progress of construction of the bypass.

    Mike Hancock, who was appointed as interim head the Transportation Cabinet after Joe Prather resigned this week, will attend the meeting, as will Chief District Engineer Matt Bullock, Kay and Kay officials and Shelby County's two state legislators, Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and state Sen. Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville).

  • ‘Good reports’ for first day of school

    At 7 a.m. Thursday, parents and their children were lined up outside Southside Elementary as the sun began to peak over the nearby tree line and welcome them to the first day of school. It was quiet, a cool 72 degrees, and the mood was relaxed.

    School faculty watched out the front doors, waiting for 7:15 a.m. – the time when the doors would open and the kids could be directed to the classrooms they’d come to know very well over the next year.

  • Shelbyville Police Reports Aug. 14, 2009

    Alcohol Intoxication

    An unidentified  male, age unknown, of the city at large in Shelbyville was arrested Aug. 8 at 8th and Washington streets and charged with alcohol intoxication.

    Duncan Mason, 50, of 1020 High Street in Shelbyville was arrested Aug. 7 at Adair and Main streets and charged with alcohol intoxication and also served with a Shelby County bench warrant.

  • Local EMS response time above national average

    Steve Wortham works with people who stare life and death in the face every day.

    His staff of 45 paramedics and EMTs work to save lives, and they do it more efficiently than just about any other  unit in the country.

    That's not just his opinion - its backed up by statistics, he says.

    Shelby County EMS, headed by Wortham, its director, enjoys a response time two minutes faster than the national average, based on statistics compiled by the American Ambulance Association.

  • CASA raising funds, awareness

    The work of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for children) may be the best kept secret in Shelby County, but Beverly Hilger wishes it weren't.

    Hilger is the director of CASA for Shelby and Spencer counties. CASA volunteers work with children who have been placed out of their homes because of abuse or neglect. Their work saves the state hundreds of thousands of dollars every year, Hilger said.

  • Arguments about global warming seem to be full of hot air

    One letter arrives as if sucked into the vortex of another, something like two powerful thunderheads colliding over the middle of the county, creating all sorts of wind and havoc.

    They speak of data and experts and opinions. They portend great insight, laying out  science and history in detail. They are doused with perspective and seasoned with rancor.

    But these letters don’t address our heaviest matters, such as war, healthcare or human rights.

    No, their topic is climatology or, more specifically, global warming.

  • Tingle named new Simpsonville Elementary principal

    Simpsonville Elementary -- meet the Tingles.

    When its Site-Based Decision-Making Council unanimously agreed last Wednesday that Jill Tingle was a perfect fit for the position of Simpsonville Elementary Principal, that group may not have realized that she'll be heading to work with half of her family by her side.