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Today's News

  • News Briefs: Sept. 16, 2009

      

    Historian at library Thursday

    Betty Gorin, historian, lecturer and author, will be at the Shelby County Public Library at 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday to speak about the raids of Confederate general John Hunt Morgan. Her book "Morgan is coming!" describes the raids north of Morgan who probably passed through Henry and Shelby counties on an escape from prison in Ohio.

  • Soccer: Lady Rockets rally past North Hardin

    The SCHS girls’ soccer team got off to a slow but good start in the Little Caesar’s Classic at Boyle County.

    The girls topped North Hardin, 3-1, but they didn’t start the game they were wanting to.

    “We did not play well in the first half of this game,” SCHS Coach Joe Turner. “North Hardin was aggressive, and we didn’t respond.”

    After a scoreless first half, North Hardin took a 1-0 lead with about 30 minutes to play in the game.

  • Golf: Rockets hammer South Oldham

    The SCHS boys’ golf team posted its best match score of the season in a 156-172 whipping of South Oldham at Weissinger Hills on Tuesday.

    Tayler Adams fired a 38 to lead the Rockets. Rounding out the rest of the top four were Josh Griffin and Jared Redmon, with 39s, and Turner Mayton, with a 40.

    The Rockets have just one match left along with two tournaments before playing in the 6th Region Tournament Sept. 28. Shelby will travel to the Marion County Classic this weekend at the Rosewood Golf Course in Lebanon.

  • Church ramps up a new project

    Early Saturday morning, members of a local church will convene for what would seem an ordinary weekend project to help a member of the community.

    When this group departs from a house just east of Shelbyville later that day, a young man who has mobility problems will find it much easier to get in and out of his home.

    But the project won’t stop there.

  • We congratulate: Bekaert for its 'greener' process

     Bekaert Corporation’s introduction recently of a new processing system that eliminates lead and replaces it with water was a clear example for all local industry and our community as a whole.

    Making our county “greener” was on The Sentinel-News’ list of goals for 2009. We challenged our governmental and industrial leaders to take up this challenge and make improvements this year.

  • Obama’s speech to students: Why was there a problem?

    Where was your student at noon Tuesday? Was he or she in a classroom or assembly watching on television as President Obama offered encouragement about our young people’s commitments to education?

    Was he or she listening to the wisdom of the person we so overwhelmingly chose last year to be our spokesperson to all mankind, being inspired by one of the most talented orators of our times?

  • Tourism director to travel to England

    It isn't often that someone gets a free trip to England.

    But when Katie Fussenegger heads across the ocean Thursday, officials hope all of Shelby County will benefit.

    Fussenegger, co-director of the Shelbyville-Shelby County Tourism Commission, was selected by Rotary International to be one of five Kentuckians to do a work-study program abroad with all expenses paid by the organization.

  • Beshear visits Shelby Wednesday

    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear makes a stop today at one of Shelby County’s most prominent farms, the home on Taylorsville Road of Kentucky Farmer of the Year Doug Langley.

    Beshear will be there at noon to discuss his Farm Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy partnership in Shelby County.

    Chosen Farmer of the Year in June, Langley raises 200 acres of burley tobacco, 2,800 acres of corn, 2,400 acres of soybeans and 60 acres of wheat. He and his family also raise 2,000 head of cattle annually.

  • ‘Stepping’ toward improvement

    Norris Beckley wants to clean up the streets of Shelbyville. To start, he needs help cleaning up the old Shelby County Community Center gym.

    It’s there, at 121 Martin Luther King Jr. Street in the community of Martinsville, that he hopes to establish Stepping Stone Youth Enrichment Inc., a program he created earlier this summer to improve the lives of underprivileged kids.

  • Neihof: I owe it to the kids

    Last year, amid the incredible learning moments I observed in classrooms and conversations with parents, teachers and community members, I heard one thing clearly: “We all want to move our students to attain even higher levels of achievement.”