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Today's News

  • What we think: Sen. Tapp's decision must be an opportunity

    Sen. Gary Tapp’s surprise announcement last week that he would not seek re-election is  bittersweet for the voters of Shelby County and his entire district.

    Mr. Tapp has served his constituents loyally and with passion for the past 12 years, and he has been true to those who elected him, a conservative base that makes up the core of the voters in Shelby, as last fall’s election results attested.

  • Derby Day makes experts out of all of us -- sort of

    So how will you spend your Derby Day? Will there be a party, a family gathering, a TV viewing or even a trip to the track itself?

    This most wonderful celebration of Kentucky’s greatest traditions – you know, wearing crazy clothes (not just hats), drinking bourbon and throwing away good money on bad hunches – is here, but how it resonates with Shelby Countians is hard to handicap.

  • Only the mint is the same

    There are a lot of deviations of a traditional mint julep –– the signature drink for the Kentucky Derby –– but if you infuse bourbon, simple syrup, crushed ice and mint “you have everything you need for the drink except the horse,” said Ice Alen, restaurant manager at Bistro 535 in Shelbyville.

    Each year almost 120,000 juleps are served at Louisville’s Churchill Downs during the 2-day period of the Kentucky Oaks and the Kentucky Derby.

  • Train hits car on 7th Street

    No one was injured in an incident last Wednesday when a train hit a car on South 7th Street, police say.

    According to the police report, Patricia Nichols, 36, of 300 Main Street in Shelbyville, stopped her car on the railroad tracks with a train coming.

    The report said the Nichols told officers her brakes failed. Police told her to step away from the car, and she did so before the train hit it.

    Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte said when the train hit the car, it knocked it into a ditch.

  • Boys track team does well at Dunbar

    The track-and-field meet at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Lexington last weekend saw success for Shelby County's boys but not so much for the girls' team.

    "The Shelby boys did extremely well," Dunbar Track and Field Coach

    Killian Timoney said. "But the girls did not do as well overall."

    Led by their relay teams, the Rockets' boys finished in third place, and the girls wound up 12th at the 6th Annual Dunbar Bulldog/Bearcat Invitational on Saturday.

  • New Business: D & R Landscaping

    D & R Landscaping   Owned by: Donnie Hawk and Ricky Grigsby.   Address: Bluebird Drive, Shelbyville.   Phone: 321-0223 or 487-0888.   What we do: Customer satisfaction is the owners' goal. Hawk and Grigsby have 12 years landscaping experience. They have power seeders and sprayers for weed control. They also can do insect control work.

  • New Business: The Bus Shizzle

    The Bus Shizzle

    Owned by: Terry Whisman Phone: 321-5453  

    What he does: The Bus Shizzle is a charter service providing transportation to and from events for family and friends. Prices will depend on the length of the trip, gas needs and time of the trip. The Bus Shizzle can be chartered for tailgating or any other outing.

  • Fire destroys house in Mount Eden

    The state fire marshal is looking into the cause of a house fire that destroyed a home in Mount Eden Sunday night, said Fire Chief Doug Herndon.

    “It was a vacant house, so at least no residents were injured, although we did have a firefighter with a minor injury, but he is OK now,” he said.

    Herndon said the call came in at about 2 a.m. and when firefighters arrived on the scene, the house was already totally engulfed by flames.

    “It wasn’t safe for us to go inside, so we had to fight the fire from the outside only,” he said.

  • It’s time to end the streak

    It has been 23 years and counting since I picked a Kentucky Derby winner. I study the past performances. I read the several different outlets coverage of the prep races. This year I’ve even watched most of the prep races online.

    Honestly though, I don’t think it will matter.

    I go through this every year: The agony of wading through stacks of information in newspapers, magazines and online all for nothing as I watch another loser cross the line.

  • Part 1: From battlefield to battle talk: the rise of a WWII hero

    Gen. David M. Shoup served as Commandant of the U. S. Marine Corps (Commander of all Marines) from Jan. 1, 1960 until Dec. 31, 1963, a 4-year period of the Cold War not without its difficulties.

    Shoup, who was a surprising nominee for this important job, would find himself before the end of his tenure embroiled in one of the most worrisome military and political events that has confronted the United States: the Cuban Missile Crisis.