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Today's News

  • Business briefcase: Nov. 20, 2009

     Houston named director

    at Whitney Young center

  • My Word: Let me help clarify student-loan issue

    I recently read an opinion piece by college student Austin Redmon (“Let’s send the money directly to the students,” Nov. 11) regarding my stance on H.R. 3221. I always appreciate hearing from constituents and knowing they are taking an interest in their government. However, some of Mr. Redmon’s facts were inaccurate.

  • Ethington found in Jefferson County

    The body of Maxine Ethington was found Sunday afternoon next to her vehicle off Beckley Station Road near Middletown.

    Shelbyville Police reported a body was found next to the car but would not identify that body. A family member later confirmed to The Sentinel-News that the body was believed to be Ethington's. A coroner's report was pending.

  • WICHE: Asian lady beetles on the move

    It happened a little later then usual this year: the attack of the lady beetles.

    Just this week dozens of people have asked, “What do I do about all the lady bugs trying to get in my house.”  Well, the short answer is seal up the house well and get out the vacuum cleaner.

  • Looking Back: November 13

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Leggett & Platt to shut down

    After being in Simpsonville for over 50 years, the Leggett & Platt plant will shut it doors in mid January.

    Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden received notice today that all 240 of the companies current workers will be out of a job by Jan. 18.

    Last month the company announced they would lay off 86 employees, with most to lose their jobs next month.

    At one time the company, which manufacturers parts for beds and chairs, was the county’s largest employer.

    Eden said the closing of the company is devastating.

  • EARLIER: A whole new perspective on Veteran's Day

    It almost is embarrassing me to admit that for most of my life Veteran’s Day has been more of an amorphous interruption of the mail and bank schedules that I had to endure than any sort of sanctioned holiday.

    School was in session, and there was no paid respite from work. Veteran’s Day was just sort of there, a poor, red-numbered step holiday to its more famous cousin in May, Memorial Day.

  • EARLIER: Rockets look to fill gaps vs. Trinity

     

    It wasn't a two-for-one trade the Rockets wanted to make, especially not at this time of the year.

    But the SCHS football team (9-2) will move on and play. At this point that's all they can do.

  • We congratulate: A man who fixed a problem he saw

    It’s easy for citizens to see holes in the community. It’s simple to make suggestions, call for assistance and, more likely, point fingers. Not so many do the harder thing: to plug that obvious hole. But one man saw a hole and did his best to plug it, and for that we commend the work of Rev. Lee Bean, the minister at Dover Baptist Church. Rev.

  • Farmers' efforts to find labor getting harder

    Shelby County’s farmers and growers say proposed rules changes by the U.S. Department of Labor for its migrant-labor program are unfair and could harm their business.

    "From what I've seen, the changes would just about kill the program," said Melvin Moffett, owner of Snow Hill Nursery. "We'll be at the mercy of local help."