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Today's News

  • These horse people talk the walk

    In the performance arena music competes with dust for air space, and the carnival tunes ebb and flow as from a hand-cranked box while around the ring the horses respond: slow walk to fast walk to canter.

    Pockets of the crowd whoop and holler for their favorites. But all is still when it's time for the judges to march around the horses and riders.

  • EARLIER: Former police officer says firing range too near school

     

    A former Shelbyville policeman says officers are shooting high-powered weapons at an outdoor firing range that is dangerously close to an elementary school.

    John Wilson, an 8-year employee and former sergeant, resigned from the department in August after telling his superiors that the range was too near Clear Creek Elementary, he told The Sentinel-News.

  • What we think: Police ideas are just a first shot

    We commend the Shelbyville Police Department for its consideration of a new training schedule at its firing range, a schedule that would ensure live bullets don’t fly during traditional school hours.

    That sort of immediate and aggressive response is important in moments of significant public concern, and we can’t be too strong in our underscoring that this is a very important public concern.

  • Power restored after morning outage

    A power outage Friday morning knocked out electricity to nearly 4,000 residences and businesses – including Shelby County High School – for about an hour and a half.

    Bob Price, team leader for Kentucky Utilities, said 3,900 KU customers lost power between 8 and 9:30 a.m. because of an equipment failure at a main power station behind Kroger.

    "We had an equipment failure at our distribution substation at Shelbyville East," he said.

    Price said that although the problem is still not repaired, crews were able to restore power to everyone.

  • Police consider moving firearms training to summer

    The Shelbyville Police Department, whose firing range is under scrutiny because of its proximity to elementary schools, is considering moving all activities there to non-school hours, Police Major Danny Goodwin said.

      "We're flexible; we'll bend," Goodwin said. "The last thing we want to do is put someone's life in jeopardy.  

  • Hardesty could go home today

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty could go home today, just a week after emergency stomach surgery was required to save his life.

    “He is going to have some tests done today. If they all are OK, then he’ll possibly go home tomorrow,” said Peggy Thompson, the mayor's administrative assistant.

    The surgery last Wednesday was in response to a bleeding ulcer – a condition that his doctor said could have resulted in death if not repaired.

  • We congratulate: Mayor Hardesty on his recovery

    We, like many citizens of Shelbyville, were stunned and concerned last week to learn of the emergency health problems confronted by Mayor Tom Hardesty.

    We certainly are pleased that he is on the mend and headed toward home and back to work.

  • Our roads well traveled lead to natural beauty

    If you have looked at the Neighbors section today, you have seen one person’s guidebook map for a way to enjoy fall in Shelby County.

    For natives and longtime residents, such a route can be drawn and redrawn, and the outcome is always simple and satisfying. There is no definitive navigation for the beauty we all enjoy.

  • EARLIER: Bypass findings: Contract, delays with inspections key problems

    FRANKFORT - A meeting Friday between state officials and the contractors working on the Shelbyville Bypass revealed two key pieces of information:

    State transportation officials admitted they won't repeat the mistakes made in what they consider a lenient contract, and Kay and Kay Construction officials said in some cases the state inspectors have delayed progress on the roadway.

    Engineers also encouraged the contractors to put larger crews on the job, and weekly meetings were scheduled to monitor progress.

  • First Christian calls Charlton