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Today's News

  • New courtyard to be built on west side of courthouse

     Shelby County Fiscal Court on Tuesday approved two new sidewalk projects, one at the courthouse and the other on Hospital Drive.

  • County takes over incomplete roads

    Some county residents who live on unfinished county roads won't have to worry about being snow- or ice-bound this winter.

    Streets in three uncompleted subdivisions will be finished off by the county before winter arrives, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said.

    And that's important, because until the streets are finished, county road workers can't enter them to remove snow and ice and do preliminary winter treatments.

  • New fire station will double as additional voting precinct location

    Voters in the northern part of the county soon will have a new voting location.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court voted Tuesday to make a new county fire station handicap accessible, which would qualify the site to act as a suitable location for a voting precinct.

    Station 5 at 7370 LaGrange Road, with its 6,000 square feet, would become the new location for voting precinct E-102, which had been located at West Middle School.

  • Saving lives, saving dollars

     

  • Hardesty is back on limited basis

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty returned to his empty chair in the middle of the Shelbyville City Council for Thursday night’s meeting, resuming his role after missing three weeks following emergency surgery.

    And the meeting, which lasted less than 30 minutes, was more an emotional welcome back for Hardesty than it was about complicated civic matters.

  • Collapse of video store's roof storm related to weather

    Last week's heavy winds and rain caused the second roof collapse at the construction site of a building in Shelbyville that eventually would house Family Video.

    That's the determination of a field inspection report from the Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings, and Construction, Division of Building Code Enforcement, whose inspectors visited the ruins on Midland Trail.

  • Centro Latino expands services, building

    Local citizens and officials attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday celebrating the recent renovations to Centro Latino that have expanded its services to the community.

    Program Coordinator Lupe Vega said what used to be an old garage has been turned into two computer labs and a clothes closet.

    “We do a lot to help people. But also we see that people need computer skills and to get a GED to move and get better jobs and have more opportunity,” she said.

  • Ruritans are true community in small towns

    "We're waiting on taters!" Mark Schank hollered to the line 20-deep at the kitchen window.

    It was just before 6 at the Mount Eden Ruritan Club Fish Fry on Friday night. Hungry customers were filling the building and taking advantage of drive-thru service. On the menu: fried fish, potato wedges, cole slaw and baked beans.

  • Business owners concerned about Simpsonville plan

    The Simpsonville City Council addressed concerns raised by property owners Henry and Barbara Lee about the proposed Village Center during Tuesday night's meeting.

    The Lee's pointed out that Village Center plans show Cardinal Drive being straightened out as it meets U.S. 60 from the south and running right through the commercial building they own. This plan, they said, has the businesses currently renting there considering moving.

  • EARLIER: Farmers deal with too much rain after years of drought

    Mother Nature can't seem to get it just right for Shelby County farmers.

    This year's wet summer, following two years of drought, have meant local farmers have to deal with a different problem: too much rain.

    “It's just like everything else, too much of a good thing is a bad thing,” said Doug Langley, who grows tobacco, corn and soybeans and was also named Kentucky Farm Bureau's Farmer of the Year.