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Today's News

  • WHAT WE THINK: Flooded creeks are more dangerous than they seem

    It seems so simple.

    When water reaches out of the banks of a river, stream, creek or even a drainage ditch, we should stay out of it.

    Especially when it’s coming down, as they say, sideways, leaving every piece of ground saturated and every rivulet looking like the mighty Mississippi.

    But here were are again, as biblical storms threaten to fill Ohio Valley, we still have people trying to drive across flooded roads and bridges.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: An unbreakable bond and a unique friendship

     

    University of Kentucky Junior All-American Willie Cauley-Stein often left us speechless on the court.

    At 7-feet tall he could glide across the floor with the quickness of men 2-feet shorter. His amazing athletic ability allowed him to soar above helpless defenders for rebounds and his rim-rattling dunks left chins dropped in awe.

    But on Thursday, Cauley-Stein left another indelible mark on us.

  • WHAT WE THINK: A win for love and a win for rights

    On Friday the Supreme Court put an end to discussion of marriage in the eyes of the law.

    With a 5-4 ruling, the Court reversed a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that had upheld same-sex marriage bans in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee.

    Now, as a nation instead of selected states, we can finally drop this silliness of referring to same-sex marriages and just say marriage.

    We understand why some do not agree with the decision, but for legal reasons we needed to have a change.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: JHS efforts on annual Men’s Health Fair

    More than two hundred likely strong-willed men turned out Saturday to make sure they remained healthy, and for that we thank Jewish Hospital Shelbyville and their co-sponsors and volunteers for their efforts.

    Providing an efficient, free set up for those in the community that either struggle with health care costs or health issues is a noble cause, and one that JHS is uniquely equipped to handle.

  • WHAT WE THINK: While cities expand tax rates are shrinking

    If it feels like your pockets are starting to fill back up a little, it’s easy to see why.

    As a whole Shelby County is thriving right now, and as Ronald Reagan would say, it’s trickling down.

    Not to say that our economic improvements have started solely at the top and worked their way down, that’s not exactly true.

    While lower gas prices will show you the most immediate gains, we need to look no futher than our own governments for a nice little boost.

  • Susanne of Allen Dale Farm, Part 3: Boarding Schools

    In July 1924, having spent over three years in Kentucky, Susanne, now nine, returned to Paris with her mother, the Marquise de Charette. Her schooling, which had begun at Nazareth Academy, near Bardstown, Kentucky, would continue in France and in Switzerland.

    Cours Dupanloup in Paris

  • Getting hitched

    Shelby County, long recognized as the Saddlebred Capital of the World, is working on gaining still another distinction – it’s a great place to get married.

    There are at least a half dozen locations in Shelby County – most of them farms – that offer venues in which to hold a wedding.

  • Revamped CUB location reopens

    One of Shelbyville’s Citizens Union Bank branches has a brand new look, and Monday opened up for business.

    Construction began on the CUB branch inside the Shelbyville Walmart on June 19, and workers put the finishing touches on this weekend. But even better than the new modern look, the transformation has given the bank customers more space, actually allowing them to walk into the bank instead of standing out in the aisle of the store.

  • Shelby football bonded at camp

    The start of football practice is always about getting in reps, introducing the old and the new concepts, finding out who can play where, but the for the Shelby County High School team the most important thing to come out of the three-day camp they attended at Eastern Kentucky University this week may have been the bonding.

  • Calvin brings home coaching honor

    It seems appropriate after 43 years in coaching, Shelby County High School assistant football coach Greg Calvin has grabbed the first honors of the upcoming football season.

    Calvin, the Shelby County defensive coordinator, was recently named the Greater Louisville Football Coaches Association’s Assistant Coach of the Year for last season.

    “I was a little bit surprised, but it was very pleasing,” Calvin said. “You don’t get into coaching for this kind of award, but it’s really nice to be recognized.”