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Today's News

  • CITY COUNCIL: Alan Matthews

    Having been born and raised in Shelbyville, city council member Alan Matthews has seen the city grow.

    He attended Shelbyville High School and has seen the small town expand past its old borders of Main and Washington streets.

    Now, as he runs for his fifth term on city council, he wants to remain a vital part of the city’s decision making.

  • A staple of the community: Antiques For You celebrates 20 years

    In 1989, Connie Kelly borrowed $1200 from her uncle Joe to start an antique business at 528 Main St. in downtown Shelbyville.

    She had just seven booths of items in the front of the store and loads of uncertainty.

    Twenty years later, Connie and her husband, Larry, run what has become a veteran piece of the downtown puzzle - Antiques For You.

  • For 30 years, they've kept autos in motion

    As Bailey's Service Center approaches its 30th year in business, owner Roy Bailey can look back and say there was only one car he couldn't fix.

    "That was because there were no parts available anymore, and we couldn't get any salvage parts," he said. "I believe it was an older-model Volvo, maybe a late-'60s model."

  • MAGISTRATE: Tony Carriss

    Magistrate Tony Carriss said he remains excited about "all the good things that create Shelby County's uniqueness" as he files for his sixth term as magistrate.

    Among what he calls those special things are the great services that county government provides, he said.

    "We are very proud that each of our county services continues to improve each year while at the same time our tax rate for Shelby County government has continued to reduce.

  • Purnell's sausage: good for the heart

    A local company known for making "goo-od” sausage is doing something good for others: sharing its pigs' heart valves.

    F.B. Purnell Sausage Co. of Simpsonville, known for its Old Folks Sausage brand, started saving the heart valves from its pigs about three to four months ago. Each day, they send those valves to a pharmaceutical company in California. That company then sends them to hospitals all over the world to be used in valve replacement surgery in humans.

  • Andriots open Bell House for lunch

    No one will be ringing the dinner bell just yet, but the Bell House is now open for lunch.

    Bob and Sue Andriot opened the Bell House at 721 Main St., what they formerly called “The Pink Lady,” for lunch Monday, and they hope later this summer to offer “upscale Mediterranean” cuisine for dinner.

  • Underground light show

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  • Lady Rockets slip up against J-town

  • News Briefs: Jan. 8, 2010

    SCPS H1N1 shots Jan. 20-21 Shelby County Public Schools will offer H1N1 vaccinations at the middle schools, high school and Cropper on Jan. 20-21. Consent packets were sent home with students on Tuesday and must be returned by Wednesday.

  • High school rocket gets facelift

    Don't worry, the SCHS rocket didn't blast off Tuesday, although it did take a trip through town.

    The rocket, which is actually an authentic Air Force rocket, was lifted off its stand at the school by a crane and placed onto a flat bed truck and taken to a local body shop to be repainted. As befitting its status as a community icon, the rocket was escorted by sheriff's deputies from Rocket Lane to Hi Tech Body Shop on Henry Clay Street.