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Today's News

  • Shelby carries early lead to victory over Western Hills

    Shelby's tenacious full-court press led to a 20-point lead at halftime, which the Rockets (11-3) carried to a 74-56 win against visiting Western Hills (7-6) Tuesday night.

    The game was at times sloppy -- 20 plus turnovers for each team -- but Shelby maintained a controlled offense except for a lapse midway through the second half. The Rockets' lackluster play going into the fourth quarter let the Wolverines within 12 points. Then Shelby's aggressive play emerged again, and the Rockets pulled ahead.

  • The outlook for 2010

    The Sentinel-News: What kind of changes do you anticipate for the county in 2010?

  • U.S. SENATE: Maurice Sweeney

    Maurice M. Sweeney says he's a farmer and businessman, not a politician.

    But this Jefferson County resident with long ties to Shelby County has announced he's running for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by Jim Bunning in the 2010 elections.

    Sweeney, a Democrat, said growing up on a 324-acre farm with tobacco and cattle just outside the Shelby County border meant he's done a lot of business in the county over the years.

    Now he wants to use what he learned on that farm to serve Kentuckians.

  • WICHE: Learn to describe plant problems accurately

    We all seek advice from experts and describing what ails us or our plants it key in determining what’s really going on; and not everyone understands the nomenclature of symptoms caused by insect and disease problems.

  • Shelbyville outlook for 2010

    The Sentinel-News: How will the city of Shelbyville change in 2010?

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty: There are many construction projects we’re looking forward to. Firehouse No. 3 will be completed here soon. That’ll offer better fire protection out in that part of the community.

  • What we think: Community fared well in meeting goals

    In January, The Sentinel-News established what we considered to be the community’s agenda for the year.

    We believe it’s our responsibility as the magnet for public discussion in Shelby County to assert our voices into conversations already in place.

    We aren’t the deciders but rather the lens or amplifier for what you are saying, the fulcrum to help persuade action.

  • Progress, near misses and catastrophes define 2009

    Presidential inauguration

    The year started with a bang with Barack Obama's historic inauguration as the nation's first African-American president.

    Thirty-nine Shelby Countians journeyed to Washington D.C. to witness the 56th presidential inauguration on Jan. 20.

    The group left Shelbyville amid falling snow and were held up due to a 40-car pile up on the interstate, but that didn't diminish their spirits.

  • What we think: This is our 2010 agenda for Shelby County

    As we promised on Dec. 29, we offer to you today our vision for the most important initiatives facing our county in 2010. Some of these concepts are under way, and others need new and continued care and feeding.

    You can expect that as the year unfolds, we will continue to offer our perspective in how well leaders and citizens are addressing these concepts and embracing their themes.

  • COUNTY CLERK: Sue Carol Perry

    Shelby County Clerk Sue Carol Perry said her love for her hometown, and her concern for her neighbors has prompted her to run for office 32 years ago.

     

    Now she's been in office longer than any of the elected officials today.

    Under the leadership of Sue Carole Perry, the County Clerk's office was the first in the county to be computerized.

  • Shelbyville’s loophole

    Middleton Heights is a network of four small streets tucked conspicuously off West U.S. 60 just west of Shelbyville. Bound by Robin Road and Peachtree Street, it’s fully engulfed by city-maintained developments.

    But here’s the literal loophole:

    MIddleton Heights was never annexed into Shelbyville, allowing homeowners in this unincorporated area to evade city property taxes for nearly 60 years.

    Many maps outlining the city boundaries show Middleton Heights as a gray hole, surrounded by a grid of streets and other development.