Today's News

  • Recent grad Griffin excited about berth in Kentucky Open

    Josh Griffin doesn't expect to win next week's 2011 PowerBilt Kentucky Open. In fact he would be happy just to make the cut.

    That's because, Griffin, 17, a recent Collins graduate, likely will be one of the youngest competitors in the Open, which will run next Tuesday through Thursday at Persimmon Ridge Golf Club in northwest Shelby County.

  • SCHS baseball has good summer

    The Shelby County baseball team has had a busy summer. The Rockets are playing in the Bluegrass Summer High School Baseball league, which was started by Shelby Coach Bart "Rudy" Roettger and Madison Central Coach Steve Roof. It is comprised of 16 teams from the Louisville and Lexington areas.

    The Rockets went into the conference tourney with a 12-9 record for the summer. In the tourney they beat Henry Clay, 7-6, in eight innings, lost to Scott County, 9-6, beat Henry Clay by forfeit and lost to Scott, 11-10, in the finals.

  • Post 37 wins opener but drops 2 and out

    The Shelbyville Post 37 American Legion baseball team won its first game in the State Tournament on Tuesday but dropped a pair of games Wednesday to be eliminated from the tournament.

    Shelbyville won its opening game, beating the defending state champs, the Edmonton Post 65 Mustangs from Metcalfe County, 16-14, at Morehead State University.

    “It was a wild one,” Coach Jim Wiley said.

    Troy Spaulding picked up the victory for Post 37, and Jordan Bailey and Zach Strecker each homered for Shelbyville.

  • Field fiasco still going

    Last year Jerry Lucas and the Collins football coaches used to call their home turf at Titan Stadium "the field of dreams."

    "The game would be starting, and there would still be headlights coming up the lane," Lucas said, referring to the final scene of the father-son, tear-jerking movie of the same name.

    Now, unfortunately, that field has become a nightmare, thanks to turf issues that have forced the field to be closed for the fall, and who knows how much longer.

  • Rebuilding Rockets should show growth

    The Shelby County boys' golf team is already showing Coach Matt Redmon growth.

    Now he's hoping the Rockets can also exhibit that against the foes they'll face on the course.

    "I'm very optimistic about this season," Redmon said earlier this week.

    "Going off our scores we've been putting up so far, they are about 30 strokes better than last year.

    "I have high expectations based on the improvement from last year."

  • Retooling Rockets expect to soar more

    The Shelby County girls' golf team graduated its best player from the past two seasons and will be without its top returning player for possibly the first month of the season.

    But Coach Anna Simpson still believes her team can make a run for a fourth consecutive State Tournament berth.

    "Even though we lost Michaela [Manley], and Shannon [Harover] could be out until the end of August, I think we're still going to be competitive," said Simpson, whose team finished seventh at State last season and third there in 2009.

  • Weather is peachy for some produce

    Better late than never: That's been the motto for vegetable farmers this year.

    The heavy spring rains left fields too muddy to plant at normal times, but crops are still pouring in.

    "The rain really postponed our early planting, but the result has been maturity dates coming later," said Mary Courtney who runs Courtney Farms in Bagdad with her husband, Shane. "For instance, we just started harvesting tomatoes this year, while last year we were harvesting them at the end of June."

  • Summer school students can’t put down their books

    Shelby County Public Schools’ new Summer Reading Academy has moved above and beyond the district’s expectations.

    During a report to the school board report after just one week of the session, Director of Secondary School Kerry Fannin discussed how students were flying through books, and the seventh and ninth grade program was going to progress well past it’s intended point, which he said hasn’t been lost on the students or teachers either.

  • SOUDER: The debt-ceiling debate: Economics according to J. Wellington Wimpy

    As I was researching today’s column concerning the ongoing debt-ceiling “crisis” in our country, I came across an item that really got my attention. Late Monday evening, Congressional leaders from both parties got together and issued a rare joint statement, as quoted in a front page story in the New York Times: “We, as leaders of Congress, wish to calm the escalating fears regarding any potential default on our debt and assure our creditors that we will gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today.”

  • EARLIER: Rural King is joining Shelby County's farm store lineup

    Shelby County is getting a new player in the farm and home retail market.

    Rural King Supply, a chain of 53 stores based in Mantoon, Ill., will open this fall in the space on Boone Station Road that had been vacated during Kroger’s move to its new marketplace store.

    “We’re very excited to be part of the community, anxious to be there,” Alex Melvin, the company’s vice president, said Wednesday. “It looks like a great area. I love flying over the area, love to see how rural it is, love how gorgeous it is.”