Today's News

  • MY WORD: Annapolis appointment fulfills dream

    From the halls of Shelby County High School...to the shores of who knows where.

    That is what Brandon Thompson is humming these days as the 2011 graduate has been accepted into the U.S. Naval Academy, fulfilling his dream of becoming a Marine.

    That dream started when, as a child, he watched military movies and documentary films about war with his grandfather.

    That dream became even more clear when retired Maj. Art Edinger showed a film about the Naval Academy to the Junior Marine Corps ROTC at SCHS when Brandon was a freshman.

  • MY WORD: A life lesson about integration from 1956

    Many years ago, when I was 25 years old and working as a writer for the Henderson Gleaner and Journal, there was an outbreak of strife just before Labor Day in September of 1956.
    At first, the troubles began at Sturgis, a small town in Union County, which we considered as part of our circulation area, the tri-counties of Henderson, Union and Webster in western Kentucky. From our small staff, the first reporter who went over to Sturgis was a young man, Karl Christ, who then was serving mainly as our sports editor. We all did double-duty frequently in those days.

  • What we think: Balancing the budget needs no amendment

    We think it’s a really good idea that our government operates each year with a balanced budget. And we couldn’t agree more with our leaders who suggest that.

    But, those points made, the requirement to balance the federal budget is not, as some lawmakers are suggesting, a Constitutional issue.

    U.S. Sen. Rand Paul was in Frankfort recently touting the idea of going through the laborious and – yes – costly process of amending the U.S. Constitution, perhaps requiring a constitutional convention, to impel lawmakers to do their jobs.

  • We congratulate: Shelby County Fiscal Court for passing its contribution to the City Center

    We were very pleased last week to see that Shelby County Fiscal Court had approved its piece of the financial pie needed to study the plan for the downtown City Center.

    We had been pushing for months for magistrates to contribute the remaining $12,500 – the other partners, the City of Shelbyville, the Shelby County School Board and the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative, did so months ago – and we are relieved that this is completed.

  • We journalists may not be worth much, but we love what we do

    I was standing in a convenience store last week, next to a new and neat stack of The Sentinel-News that I had just delivered because the guy contracted to do so was sick.

    (Hey, nobody wants the paper to get out more than I do, so you do what needs to be done. To understand that, read on.)

    And while I was there, a guy walked up and took a paper off the top, for which I thanked him.

  • EARLIER: Shelby Parks unveiling a plan for trail around Shelbyville

    Think about going out for a run or a walk and being able to get on a trail at Clear Creek Park and tour the perimeter of Shelbyville to wind up at Red Orchard Park.

    That long-range vision is starting to come into focus, and the Clear Creek  Conservation Trust is planning to spread the word to the public at a meeting March 28 at Collins High School.

  • Tornado drill: Twist and crouch

    Tornado sirens blasted away at 10:07 a.m. Tuesday, and students at Southside Elementary and all over Kentucky took place in a statewide tornado drill.

    The drill is held each spring, marking March as Severe Storms Awareness Month.

    Southside Principal Susanne Burkhardt complimented the young students on their orderly behavior.

    “They did very well; they were very well behaved and I am very proud of them,” she said.

  • EARLIER: Anderson jail spat could bring $$$$ to Shelby

    Anderson County Jailer Joani Clark says she is considering moving inmates to Shelby County, which could be a boon for the Shelby County Detention Center.
    Clark revealed the problems she is having with Franklin Jailer Billy Roberts during last Tuesday morning’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    “We’ve had numerous problems, and it’s getting on my last nerve,” Clark said during her department head report. “I’m getting a proposal from Shelby County.”

  • Woman injured by gas is improving

    Jennifer Lewis, the woman who was poisoned by carbon monoxide in January, is continuing to recover at a hospital in Louisville, and this past weekend friends gathered for a benefit to help pay for that recovery.

    A fundraiser held by the Wright Elementary School PTA moms at the school Friday was very well-attended, said PTA President Angela Bowens.

    “It went very well; we had somewhere between five and six hundred people,” Bowens said, adding she has not heard what the total contributions are.

  • Craig, Fast get new court dates

    Two high-profile court cases, one involving embezzlement and the other homicide-related, were rescheduled Tuesday in Shelby Circuit Court.

    Kelly Craig, 45, a longtime former employee of Tracy’s Home Furnishings who was charged with stealing thousands from that store, was given a new court date of April 18.

    Joshua Fast, 24, charged with second-degree manslaughter and second-degree burglary, also had been scheduled to appear before Circuit Judge Charles Hickman, but his case was continued to May 2.