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Today's News

  • Focus on sidewalks pushed to backburner

    Throughout downtown Shelbyville flowers are blooming in the yards of historic homes that have been restored to their original beauty, birds are chirping and children are laughing. It’s easy to get lost in the beauty of the city.

    But it’s also easy to snap out of that captivation when you get tripped up on the damaged sidewalks. 

  • 4th sparks an interest in fireworks

    With tents popping up throughout the city, a newcomer might think the circus is in town, but locals know what those tents bring and it’s not clowns and acrobats…it’s better.

    Under those big tops you’ll find gunpowder, chemicals, fuel and other scientific and testosterone-fueled ingredients needed to create the ideal pyrotechnic display – perfect for celebrating your independence with friends and family.

    In other words, fireworks have arrived in Shelby County.

  • 4 arrested in bizarre crime spree

    A bizarre crime spree earlier this month involving a joy ride in a stolen car and breaking into a school and a church, has law enforcement and victims alike shaking their heads in bafflement.

    “It’s kinda nuts,” said Dennis Dove, executive minister at Shelby Christian Church, one of three facilities hit in a frenzy of burglary and vandalism by four Shelby County teens during the first week of June.

  • Adult day care services in jeopardy in Shelby

    Shelby County’s Adult Day Care Center will be soon be forced to cut its services in half due to a reduction in funding, officials say.

    The center, located at the Shelby County Senior Citizens Center on 207 Washington Street and operated by Mulitpurpose Community Action Agency, will remain open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. five days per week, but that could change as soon as next month, said Pat Sullivan, director of the adult day program.

  • Shelby County Fair Horse Show

    With perfect weather and nearly ninety entries on the final day, the recipe for the Shelby County Fair Horse Show was perfect for a packed crowed.

    The final day consisted of 18 classes, with some of those hosting as many as 13 entries.

  • Board will look at altering voting districts

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hear recommendations on redistricting for the board’s

    geographic boundaries at their regular meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday in the district's offices, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The proposed changes are a result of rezoning done by the county to balance the population after the 2010 Census, according to Ryan Allan, the public relations coordinator for the district. In regards to population changes, the county clerks office made some changes to voting boundaries.

  • A Kentucky Proud yard

    The temperatures may be rising into the nineties this week but Joan Brown, known to many locals as the Road Kill Chef, isn’t slowing down in her garden.

    “Sometimes I have to tell myself, Joan slow down you can’t work like you used to,” she said with a smile.

    But those years of hard work are being recognized.

  • City council to discuss non-domestic animal ordinance

    The Shelbyville City Council isn’t quite ready to present their garbage Requests for Proposals [RFPs] to the public yet.

    However, Mayor Tom Hardesty said those proposals would be on the agenda next month. The council’s next regularly scheduled meeting is July 3.

    But for the council’s special called meeting this week, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at city hall, 315 Washington Street, the council will discuss the non-domestic animals ordinance.

  • Family returns to explore their Shelbyville heritage

    From stores to residential areas, as you travel throughout Shelby County it does not take long to find the name Middelton plastered across various landmarks. But who are the Middelton’s?

    This past Saturday, families traveled from Florida, Texas, Georgia, Missouri and North Carolina for a reunion in Shelby County with that same question on their minds.

    Armed with stacks of research papers, photos, cameras and laptop files galore, the family went on what they dubbed the Caudill/Middelton heritage tour, soon discovering answers to those family questions.

  • Bringing beauty back into the Blue Gables

    Residents may have vacated the old Blue Gables Motel Monday, but that does not mean the rooms are currently without inhabitants.  On a tour of the building Thursday afternoon, roaches, bedbugs and other forms of life scaled the walls and scooted across the floors of the apartments that some Shelbyville residents called home just days ago.

    This week, the Shelbyville Preservation Group purchased and obtained the hotel turned low-income housing with the hopes of restoring the dilapidated, yet historic property.