Today's News

  • Ex-Rockets help Titans blast off to better start

    The Collins and Shelby County softball teams have had their share of ups and downs this season, although the Titans have had more “ups” collectively. 



    The Titans (7-6, 2-1 in the 30th District) won their first three games, lost their next five (three by one run) and have won four of their last five. Their lone loss during that stretch was a 1-0 setback at then-second-ranked Mercy Academy.

  • Teams are a match set: Inexperience dominates

    The split of Shelby County may have affected tennis more than any other sport. All four county teams have had some early-season growing pains as they’ve all dealt with their fair share of greenness.



    Without any varsity experience – and a No. 1 singles player with no match experience whatsoever – Collins lost its four matches. The Titans (2-6), though, have won two of their last four, including a victory last week against Shelby County, albeit a short-handed Rockets team.

  • Titans have been surging; Rockets have roared ahead

    The boys’ track and field teams at Collins and Shelby County appear to be hitting their strides, but the girls’ teams for both are slightly slower out of the blocks because of illness and injury. 



    The Titans’ boys captured their first team title April 19 in their own all-comers meet, and the girls’ best finish was a second on Collins’ track the week before.

  • Collins hosting tourney for the cure

    Collins softball coach Jim Axline coaches a girls' sport, so it only seemed right to the first-year head coach to put together this weekend's Breast Cancer Awareness Tournament at Collins.

    "We played in one when I was at Shelby County," said Axline a former assistant coach with the Rockets. "I liked the idea, and plus we're playing a female sport. Chances are one of the girls I coach will be affected by it."

  • Luci Center to add sensory riding trails

    The Luci Center's indoor and outdoor riding rings are great places for the center to focus its therapeutic riding and hippotherapy services, but the center is looking for more.

    But this year the Luci Center is planning to add a sensory integration trail.

    The center, which opened in 1988, works with children and adults with disabilities through horse riding and related activities.

    As a member of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association, the Luci Center uses several different techniques to help riders.

  • Tech school, JCTC working to manufacture new jobs

    Jefferson Community and Technology College and the Shelby County Area Technology Center are looking for a few good students - good students who are ready for good-paying jobs.

    With some prodding from the Shelby County Industrial & Development Foundation, JCTC has its new Industrial Maintenance program off the ground this year, but the only problem is not many people know about it.

    The same goes for the Area Technology Center, where the program missed a year and is currently being revamped.

  • EARLIER: Shelby native is jumping at the chance to compete at Rolex event

    The last time Hannah Sue Burnett rode in an event so close to home, things didn't turn out like she'd hoped.

    That was at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event in 2007, when, at the age of 20, Burnett, a native of Finchville, saddled up against some of the best in the world and finished 23rd.

    "I was so nervous. I just wanted to finish," she said.

    Now 24, Burnett is making her return to Lexington this weekend for one of eventing's biggest competitions, and she said she's and hoping for something much bigger.

  • McDonald’s adds 26 in Shelby after blitz

    The National Hiring Day that McDonald’s held April 19 had an impact in Shelby and surrounding counties.

    Representatives of Rick Peter, who owns three stores in Shelby County – two in Shelbyville and one in Waddy – reported a solid turnout on the one-day application bonanza held by the restaurant chain.

    To reiterate, McDonald’s was looking to fill 50,000 jobs nationally, and it’s “job fair” drew millions of applicants for jobs ranging from cash register attendant to management.

  • EARLIER: Tornado tragedy touches families

    The horror of the tornadoes that ravaged the south Wednesday unfolded for all of us on TV screens, in news reports, on video posted on the Web and from narrated live reports streamed from various locations.

    Even as we in Shelby County were enduring threats and sirens to alert us of possible storms of our own, we watched perhaps the worst such catastrophe in history blow across the hills and plains of Mississippi, Alabama, into Georgia and beyond.

  • Shelby man says he has established his own 'kingdom'

    Late one recent afternoon, a cadre of Kentucky State Police troopers and Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies gathered in Todds Point. They donned their protective vests and planned their strategy.
    Their assignment: serve a warrant to a resident charged with driving without a valid license.
    Yes, KSP rallied officers from two police units as a precaution in serving this warrant.
    But officers say they had their reasons to be concerned, because they weren’t serving this warrant to just an ordinary scofflaw.