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Today's News

  • Collins girls' soccer team beats Meade in opener

    The Collins girls’ soccer team won its season-opener Monday night, beating Meade County, 3-0, at Clear Creek Park.

    Junior Shelby Vogel and seniors Hannah Garner and Sarah Robinson tallied goals for the Titans, who went 9-8-2 in their inaugural season.

    Vogel, a midfielder, broke a scoreless tie with a little less than six minutes remaining in the first half when her shot from outside the goal box took a hot hop and bounced over the diving Meade County goalie.

  • SCPS in court on road dispute

    As Shelby County Public Schools welcomes students back to classes today, some members of the administration may be in court.

    The district's lawsuit against WAZE Development for breach of contract in an agreement to extend Discovery Boulevard to Midland Industrial – for an outlet to Freedom's Way – is scheduled to be heard in Shelby County Circuit Court.

  • Welcome back students: A primer to the school year in Shelby County

    As schools open today at 7:30 a.m. for elementary, 8:30 for high schools and 8:40 for middle schools, students, teachers and administrators will see a lot of new faces, some familiar faces in new places and some old places updated with new looks and a lot of new technology.

    So, here are few of the changes, upgrades, updates and policy changes this year for Shelby County Public Schools.

    Which schools have new principals?

  • Shelby County Board of Education: Split-level Southside gets its 1st look

    The Shelby County Board of Education heard its first update on the new Southside Elementary School project during Thursday’s meeting.

    Architects from K. Norman Berry outlined the school’s early footprint but noted that they will be back in the next few weeks with a more detailed development plan.

    Superintendent James Neihof was quick to remind the board that the proposals were just a start. “This is a beginning plan, not a final plan,” he said.

  • NEIHOF: Getting Shelby’s students ready for college/career really a ‘big goal’

    The mission of our school district is reflected in our ultimate Big Goal – graduate by 2016 all students meeting college and career readiness benchmarks. I would like those in the community to be able to discuss the goals with students, friends, family and neighbors.

    But I also hope that understanding the goals helps you to gain insight into the purpose of our work in Shelby County Public Schools this school year.

  • What we think: We have a bridge over troubled waters

    Shelby County Fiscal Court is moving quickly this week to close the Who Da Thot It Bridge – commonly called Jail Hill Bridge – that historic span connecting downtown Shelbyville north from 5th Street. In fact, even as you read this, the bridge already may be closed.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger cited a recent inspection of the bridge by the state as his basis for asking magistrates on Tuesday morning for an executive order to close the bridge immediately as a matter of public safety.

  • We congratulate: A really big -- and good -- show

    Another successful Shelbyville Horse Show has finished its run, and by all accounts its 22nd edition may have been the biggest and best ever.

    Certainly large crowds turned out during the four days, despite sweltering heat, and the number of horses entered grew significantly, bringing in vans from as far away as Texas to compete against the best.

  • Some gaps of fear are just hard for us to bridge

    There was a woman with whom I once worked who had a phenomenal phobia about bridges, which, living in Florida as we did, was something not easily managed.

    She had a Golden Rule about bridges: Don’t go unto them, and they can’t do unto you. She would drive to great lengths to avoid a span of any size greater than, say, a 2-lane culvert-crosser.

  • Shelby’s fair focus: Its parks system

    For 110 years the Kentucky State Fair has been bringing in the top agricultural, equine, crafts and attractions that the commonwealth has to offer. Add to that some world-class entertainment and rides, and the fair is one of the biggest draws of the year for Kentucky.

    With more than 600,000 descending on the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center starting Thursday and running through Aug. 28, the 11-day event will raise more than $13 million.

    And Shelby County will no doubt have its usual presence.

  • County decides to close old bridge

    Historic Who Da Thot It Bridge, shut down Monday for safety reasons, may now be closed to vehicle traffic forever.
    Magistrates voted Tuesday morning at the meeting of Shelby County Fiscal Court to call a public hearing to close the bridge after discussing the merits of trying to get the structure repaired or replaced.

    County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said he got a call two weeks ago from state officials informing him that bridge inspectors judged the bridge was unsafe and that the county needed to either repair it, replace it or close it.