Today's News

  • Ford's plans good news for Martinrea

    As Ford Motor Company keeps pumping money into its Louisville assembly plants, news keeps getting better and better for Shelby County.

    Earlier this year, Martinrea Heavy Stamping had announced the addition of 150 new jobs and that it would be rehiring 45 more employees, and now with Ford and the United Auto Workers union agreeing to a new contact, the plant in Shelbyville could see an even bigger increase.

  • EARLIER: Simpsonville Elementary fails NCLB growth model

    After reading reports of increased scores and improvement across the board for the district in the Kentucky Core Content Tests, parents of students at Simpsonville Elementary School may have been surprised this week by what they read in a letter they received from the school.

    By only meeting nine of 10 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals this year and hitting only 10 of 12 in 2010, Simpsonville missed meeting the federal government's No Child Left Behind AYP goals two years in row, which means the school falls into the School Improvement Plan, Year 1 category.

  • Business Briefcase: Oct. 7, 2011

    Through the Looking Glass

    will close on Oct. 22

    Through the Looking Glass, the unique tea-and-eats shop in downtown Shelbyville, is closing, effective Oct. 22.

    Owner Regan Wann announced the decision in an E-mail and on the store’s Facebook page, saying that the past few months had been rough for her both personally and professionally.

  • Ag Report: Oct. 7, 2011

    Conservation program

    launches sign-up period

    Conservation Farm Bill programs are in effect, and there are programs that could be of benefit to producers in Shelby County.

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive more information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial funding opportunities.

  • SOUDER: When bad things happen to good people

    Perhaps no question is more misunderstood or has kept more people away from God than this: Why do bad things happen to good people?

    The implied questions are more direct: Why didn’t God keep this from happening? How could a good God allow evil, pain and suffering – particularly to “good” people?

  • Shelby woman gets diversion for embezzling

    A Shelby County woman sentenced in September in Jefferson Circuit Court to 5 years in prison for embezzling more than $70,000 from her employer will not have to serve any time.

    Andrea Nicole Murphy, 31, of 30 Lees Court in Shelbyville pleaded guilty Sept. 9 to fraudulent use of a credit card, theft by deception and misuse of electronic information.

  • New district lines get final approval from fiscal court

    Shelby County Fiscal Court rejected a zone change to allow a recyling facility to open on  Kentucky Street, but magistrates also addressed during their meeting Tuesday the new districts that they will serve starting in 2012.

    Those new magisterial district boundaries, redefined this past summer because of the 2010 census, are a done deal with the passing of a second reading of an ordinance that specified the changes.

  • Shelby woman hopes to raise enough money to regain her sight

    Savannah Sanders is much like other 21-year-olds, with many of the same hopes, fears and dreams.

    Except for one.

    She wishes fervently to be able to see the faces of her loved ones again someday soon.

    Blinded in a childhood accident 11 years ago and enveloped in darkness for past decade.

    But Sanders’ dream could become a reality, with a community-wide event scheduled this weekend to help raise money to pay for her corrective surgery.

  • Special judge named in Ethington case

    The appointment of a special judge in the case against the owners of Ethington Auto was confirmed Thursday at a hearing in Shelby District Court, in which yet anther date was set for a disposition hearing in the case.

    Special Judge Matthew Eckert, formerly of Jefferson County, will preside over the case because Shelby’s district judges had recused themselves because they know Ethington personally and one of them goes to church with him, Ethington’s attorney said Sam Carl.

  • Craig pleads guilty to theft at Tracy’s

    A long-time employee pleaded guilty Wednesday to stealing thousands from Tracy’s Home Furnishings in Shelbyville.

    Kelly Craig, 45, of Shelbyville agreed with prosecutors to plead guilty to the five original charges for which she was indicted – five counts of theft by unlawful taking over $10,000, all Class C felonies.

    Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney Laura Donnell has recommended seven years for each count, to run concurrently, for a total sentence of seven years, to be probated for that amount of time.