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Today's News

  • Shelby's 2011 grads were better prepared than most students statewide

    Students in the Class of 2011 from Shelby County were more ready for life after high school than most in Kentucky.

    Data released Tuesday by the Kentucky Department of Education shows that nearly 60 percent of 2011  high school graduates statewide left school unprepared for college or the workforce, but Shelby’s two high schools fared significantly better than that.

  • Gas prices go bump (down) at the pump

    All across Shelby County – and probably everywhere else in the U.S. – people are revving p the conversation this week about a topic that never gets old: the drop – and sometimes variation – in gas prices.

     “Just yesterday, I changed prices downwards four times, for a total of nine cents,” William Hill, manager of Swifty gas station on Midland Trail in Shelbyville, said on Wednesday.

  • Williams' visit to Shelby is all about jobs plan

    With the campaign for governor heading toward its final month, State Senate President David Williams, the Republican who wants the job, brought his platform for economic reform to the Stratton Center in Shelbyville early Tuesday morning.

    An enthusiastic crowd of maybe two dozen of mostly Shelby County Republican leaders – and one curious student – listened attentively as Williams described not only what he thought was wrong with the business environment in the state but also the way Gov. Steve Beshear and President Barack Obama were doing their jobs.

  • Business Briefcase: Sept. 30, 2011

    Business help erect

    new board at SCHS

    Two business leaders in Shelby County brought their organizations together to help their alma mater.

    Pat Hargadon of Shelby County Farm Bureau and Belinda Baker Nichols of Commonwealth Bank & Trust, 1979 graduates of Shelby County High School and also parents of students at SCHS.

  • HOLLAND: How to analyze the flows in your financial plan

    For most investors – even those with significant wealth – a secure financial future doesn’t simply happen. Instead, it must be carefully crafted to help meet your most important goals and leave nothing to chance. Of course, the future is unpredictable and your own personal situation changes over time. That makes it all the more challenging to answer the most crucial of financial questions: Are you on track to achieve your financial objectives?

  • New Business: Money Now

    Address:122 E. Main Street, Shelbyville

     

    Who we are:Money Now is a payday loan company with several locations in Kentucky. Owner Dennis J. Goodman Jr. has opened this store. Darlene is the store manager who has more than 20 years experience in management and customer service. Heather is the assistant manager who has several years experience in customer service.

     

  • EARLIER: Suspect in Simpsonville bank robbery strikes again

    Less than a week after a robber held up Commonwealth Bank & Trust in Simpsonville on Thursday, police say they believe the same robber has struck at a bank in St. Matthews.

    The American Founders Bank in St. Matthews was robbed Tuesday when a suspect who appears to be the same man caught on surveillance cameras in Simpsonville walked up and handed a note to a teller, Shelby County Sheriff’s Det. Jason Rice said.

  • Line dancing

    These students at Shelby County High School didn’t even wait for the teacher to come in the gym before starting their arts and humanities lesson for the morning. With music blaring in the gym, the students performed a line dance as part of the curriculum.

  • One lane of I-64 eastbound near Franklin line to be closed tonight

    The Department of Highways District 5 Office announces the temporary closure of the right lane on eastbound Interstate 64 in Shelby County between Mile Points 45 and 46 between 6 p.m. and midnight tonight.

  • WICHE: Naturalize the landscape with colorful sumacs

    You probably have noticed them in early fall along roadsides in Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The red, orange and purple color of the sumacs usually begins to show up earlier than others and it usually hangs around a little longer, too.

    You would be hard-pressed to come up with a plant genus that is better for fall color than the sumacs. Whether you’re a flameleaf, staghorn or smooth sumac, fall color is your middle name.