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Today's News

  • Shelby County School Board: Academy gets accelerated review

    The Shelby County Board of Education will get an update on the Accelerated Academy during its meeting Thursday.

    Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith will give a presentation on the academy and how the students are managing with their heavy load of courses during the meeting, which is at  7 p.m. at the district’s central office, 1155 Main Street.

  • T.S. Baxter: A nearly forgotten pioneer

    Thomas Samuel Baxter, better known as T.S., is a name that should resonate throughout Shelby County and especially in Shelbyville.

    There are a lot of people who say they know his name, but very few who really know much about him.

    Baxter was the first African-American member of the Shelbyville City Council, but after recognizing that accomplishment, there seems to be a dearth of information and very little celebration of his life and work.

  • Montell: Charter bill may yet be OK

    State Rep. Brad Montell said he remains optimistic that his charter-school school bill could catch on this session.

    After two hours of testimony on charter schools in front of the House Education Committee last week, Montell (R-Shelbyville) said he felt very good about where his bill stands with the committee, despite the fact that no vote was taken on whether or not to send the bill to the House floor.

  • MY WORD: Students learn to live with type 1 diabetes

    As many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes, often referred to as juvenile diabetes. The rate of type 1 diabetes incidents among children under the age of 14 is estimated to increase by 3 percent annually worldwide.

    Those statistics hit home with Shelby County Public Schools students Bryan Stapleton and Jacob Lisby, who both have experienced two of the warning signs – extreme thirst and frequent urination.

    Jacob said he also remembers “sitting around and doing nothing; felt I couldn’t,”

  • Stormhaven Ranch helps horses help kids help horses

    Shelby County’s pastoral countryside and get-away-from-it-all-draw have beckoned many a family to relocate to a setting that gives their children a chance to experience a simpler lifestyle, and it was those very magnets that attracted Mike and Gaye Cox to Shelby County more than 20 years ago.

    Gaye Cox, having grown up in Mississippi, met Mike, an Air Force kid, in school. They married young and ended up moving to Colorado. They decided early in their marriage that Gaye Cox would forgo working outside the home in order to work full-time raising their six children.

  • An honest history lesson on Abraham Lincoln

    History always has been one of those amorphous topics to most of us, defined by our relationships to events and eventualities more than encyclopedic endeavors.

    If you had no reason to have studied the dynasties in China, the crusades to the Middle East or the founding of our nation/state/county, then you probably didn’t, unless someone stuck a book in front of you and required your attention for a semester or so.

  • What we think: Let’s bulldoze before we annex

    The owners of the former Wesley Apartments, on the corner of U.S. 50 and Freedom’s Way, now are asking to be annexed into the city of Shelbyville, and the city council has given that request its first approval.

    We’re not opposed to having the property annexed – in fact, we think it should be and positioned for new businesses – but why on earth would the city want to accept this excruciating eyesore as it now exists?

  • We congratulate: Shelby’s public garden project

    The new garden plots that the North Central Health Department and Shelby County Fiscal Court have laid out for free public use in Shelbyville are a bloomin’ good idea.

    We like the fact that some awkward space at the intersections of 11th Street, Kentucky Street and Equity Street, which could have been a magnet for new concrete, has been prepared for the ultimate in green endeavors.

    We can’t think of a better initiative to promote public health for the health department to embrace.

  • County to ban fake marijuana

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court has taken the first step toward banning synthetic marijuana, which law enforcement officials say is an expanding problem.
    At their meeting Tuesday morning, magistrates passed a first reading of an ordinance to prohibit the use or sale of synthetic cannabinoids.
    Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong said the artificial drug has not been seen much in county, but is becoming more prominent.

  • ELECTION 2012: 6 Republicans vying for Congress visit Shelby

    Just one day after the deadline for filing for the race for Shelby County’s new congressional district, six of the seven Republicans who want to serve in the in the 4th District showed up Saturday night for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day dinner.
    Three of the five Republicans running for Shelbyville City Council also were on hand among a crowd of about 200 who munched on a buffet dinner and perspectives at Claudia Sanders Dinner House.