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Today's News

  • WICHE: Best books 2010

    I like a book that tells a story while teaching me a little something along the way.  I like when the writer’s personality is revealed in their prose, and I like when a book makes me feel like I am not the only one that marvels at what nature and people can do.
    Here are my 2010 picks for just this sort of thing:

  • Ford’s changes a boost locally

    Ford Motor Company's retooling of the Louisville Assembly Plant is going to have some spillover into Shelby County.
    When Martinrea International reached an agreement with the United Auto Workers Local 238 last year, management said new programs would be coming.
    It appears that Ford's changes for Louisville are going to be a big part of those new programs.
    Earlier this month, Ford announced plans to retool and expand the Louisville Assembly Plant, which currently makes the Explorer. The changes will move the Explorer production to Chicago.

  • EARLIER: Girl dies in early morning fire

    Sadness has blanketed the community of Waddy and Heritage Elementary, where 6-year-old Elizabeth Brown went to kindergarten.
    Less than a week before Christmas, Elizabeth died early Sunday morning when she was trapped in her burning home.
    Neighbors were able to help Justin and Tanya Brown and 2-year-old Justin Brown Jr. out of the burning home, but they were unable to save Elizabeth, who was found by firefighters just before 5 a.m., nearly 3 hours after they arrived at the blaze.

  • EARLIER: Police concerned about metal thefts

      Thefts of metal, primarily copper, have become a focus for officers in Shelby County.

    “Over the past couple of weeks, the county has been experiencing an increase in the number of metal thefts, more specifically, copper, because it’s bringing a premium price right now,” said Shelby County Sheriff’s Detective Jason Rice.

  • Thomas C. Sampson: 1951-2010

    Tommy Sampson is known  most widely for being a pioneer of emergency medicine, including founding Shelby County Emergency Services.

    But Sampson, 59, who died Christmas Day after a long battle with throat cancer,

  • Community continues to help Browns

    In an outpouring of compassion, Shelby Countians have reached out to help a family that lost their 6-year-old daughter in a fire that left them homeless less than a week before Christmas.

  • Popular Collins student dies in crash

    At a prayer vigil Monday night at First Baptist Church Shelbyville, friends and family of Haley Simpson gathered to share their sorrow of losing someone so young, someone known for an uncommonly kind heart and a giving nature.

    Simpson, 16, a sophomore at Collins High School, died Monday from injuries she received in an auto accident Sunday on I-64 in Indiana that left five others injured.

  • Retailers have happy holiday

    There may not have been many iPads, Kindles or Kinects available on Main Street, but the holiday shopping season seems to have been a success.

    Following the national trend that saw spending increasing, some Shelby County shop owners said this holiday season was a winner.

    Stores reported being either close to or exceeding expectations and goals for the season, and a big reason for that was a mantra the store owners kept hearing all throughout December.

  • Shelbyville to pick up trees

    The European tradition for taking down Christmas decorations is Jan. 6, but many people in the U.S. take advantage of the New Year's holiday weekend to get the garland down and ornaments stowed away, if they haven't already.

    But what to do with that 8-foot tree you put in the living room?

    If you live in city limits of Shelbyville, you won't have to do much.

    Starting today, the city's Public Works Department will come pick up live trees from the curb.

  • Shelby County’s 2010 Fabulous 5

    The Sentinel-News for three years now has at year’s end honored five Shelby Countians we think made significant impact on the community during the year. Each person named to what we now call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an indelible legacy that will define our community going forward and inspire those who follow. Their impacts cross the spectrum of society and, we believe, represent some of our most significant and important accomplishments.

     

    Matt Bullock/Highway Engineer