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Today's News

  • When it comes to our weather, it’s hard to get the picture

    Wednesday. 12:30 a.m. The tornado sirens are blaring through the wind and rain outside and windows closed against them. My wife’s voice is equally rousing, and I spring from my bed to see what is the matter.

    We grabbed up the kids and scurried to the basement, opened the door slightly and turned on the TV to track whatever mayhem was causing those sirens to blare.

    I’m sure many of you did the same, alerted, awakened and ambulated into early morning emergency response mode.

  • What we think: We must fund I-64 ramp repair

    You had to be pleased and heartened by the news that the frighteningly short and deadly ramp from KY 55 onto eastbound Interstate 64 was on tap for repair within the next year.

    That’s what state transportation engineer Matt Bullock told Shelby County Fiscal Court, and we believe Mr. Bullock would not have been so public with his comments if the schedule were not indeed set in at least asphalt.

  • We congratulate: Circuit Court Clerk Lowry Miller's decision about Ten Commandments

    The debate about whether the Ten Commandments should be displayed in governmental buildings is predictable because of its foundation in the conflict of human emotions and beliefs against legal interpretations by the courts.

    When letter writer Linda Allewalt last week again raised the issue about whether the commandments should be posted visibly in government offices in Shelby County, the response from many was equally expected: We believe in these commandments, and they are the foundation for our laws. Thus, they should be displayed.

  • MY WORD: Could we agree on posting these Four Commandments?

    During the past several decades, we have had a number of court rulings:

    §       School-sponsored prayer or Bible reading.

    §       Removal of creches from public property.

    §       Ending the Pledge of Allegiance as mandatory.

    §       Removal of the Ten Commandments from public property.

  • MY WORD: 10 reasons why the commandments should come down

    I wholeheartedly support Linda Allewalt in her efforts concerning removal of the Ten Commandments from the walls of Shelbyville’s government buildings (“Ten Commandments must come down,” April 20).

    I don't understand the reluctance in taking it down – unless it's a daily reminder to the religious government employees who might forget? Let's go through the list itself as it

    might apply to a government building:

  • EARLIER: Accused murder Gary Bancroft indicted as persistent felony offender

    LAWRENCEBURG ­– The man suspected of slicing his girlfriend’s throat and stuffing her body into a trash bag last fall was indicted Wednesday as a persistent felony offender, according to documents on file in Anderson Circuit Court.

    Gary Bancroft is charged with first-degree murder and tampering with evidence in the death of Frances Renee Mobley, who was found dead at Bancroft’s residence last September.

  • SCHS students honored at board meeting

    School board members were treated to student video presentations at Thursday night’s board meeting at Central Office.

    Three Shelby County High School students, Michaela Stoudemire, Matthew Perry and Sarah Durham, were presented awards of recognition after the audience watched their presentations.

    Shelby County High School teachers Julie Webb and Kathy Wrightson introduced the presentations, describing them as digital storytelling by the students as part of the TAG (Talented and Gifted) Program, using photos accompanied by music.

  • News Briefs: April 27, 2011

    Triple S sets public hearing to review 7th Street corridor

    The Triple S Planning Commission has received the Shelbyville 7th Street Corridor Plan from the City Solutions Center and will be holding a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. May 17.

  • Superintendent evaluated as ‘excellent’

    Usually it’s the student who gets a report card, but last week it was the superintendent’s turn.

    For the second year in a row, James Neihof scored an “excellent” on the Shelby County Board  of Education’s annual superintendent’s evaluation, which was submitted at the board’s meeting Thursday night.

  • Overnight storms spare Shelby

    Some dangerous overnight storms dumped rain and brought high winds to Shelby County, but residents awoke to a welcome and startingly bright sunshine for the first time in more than a week.

    Several potentially dangerous formations passed over the county in the night, and so far there have been no reports of damage.

    Skies cleared early, and though there is a chance for more storms today and tonight, conditions should be favorable until at least Monday.