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Today's News

  • SCHS boys’ basketball coach resigns

    Shelby County boys’ basketball coach Rick Parsons won’t be back at that post next season. 

    “He has resigned his position as head boys’ basketball coach due to personal reasons,” Shelby County Principal Eddie Oakley said Tuesday morning.

    Parsons has coached the Rockets for the past two seasons.

    “We thank him for his couple of years of service with Shelby County boys’ basketball and his contributions he made to our young people,” Oakley said.

  • Shelby County School Board: ‘New’ Northside gets another look

    The Shelby County Board of Education on Thursday will take another look at the new Northside Early Childhood Center.

    During its regular meeting this week at the district offices, at 1155 Main St. in Shelbyville, the board will hear from K. Norman Berry Architects on an updated design of the building that the firm first presented last month. The board has asked for a more traditional look.

  • News briefs: March 20, 2012

    Hornback bill

    Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) has pulled his telecommunications deregulation bill, dubbed the “AT&T Bill,” because of public outcry against the bill.

  • EARLIER: Burry, Andriot push Blue Gables renovation

    A plan to help revitalize a blight area in downtown Shelbyville is coming together, but it needs a little help from citizens.

    A group led by Bob Burry and Bob Andriot have formed the Shelbyville Preservation Group, a non-profit corporation, which has put in motion the process to secure government funding to purchase the old Blue Gables Motel at the corner of 8th and Main streets.

    The motel, which is now an apartment complex, would be renovated and turned into an art and retail area offering 18 small shops.

  • A memory of a buried March that is not buried by time

    Spring fever is supposed to arrive early in March, when you see the first robin, the bright yellow of an occasional daffodil, things green, abud and, well, warming.

    Spring fever is not supposed to be a full-blown summer sweat at the strike of the vernal equinox.

    It’s not as if there isn’t always plenty to talk about with basketball, politics, religion, economics, basketball, politics and, I don’t know, movies, but today we have to talk about the weather, because everyone is.

  • NEIHOF: New grading system up for discussion

    “Grading procedures do not reflect today’s teaching standards,” said Thomas R. Guskey from the University of Kentucky at a recent training session for principals in Shelby County. He could prove his point with a 1917 report card that belonged to his grandmother, which looked pretty much like a report card issued today.

    He and Lee Ann Jung, also from UK, shared their expertise in standards-based grading for Shelby County Public Schools because we have completed a study of their book, Grading Exceptional and Struggling Learners.

  • What we think: A great new idea for downtown

    Robert Burry had a vision, and Bob Andriot saw it clearly, a vision that holds beautiful hope for downtown Shelbyville.

    Mr. Andriot, a lifelong downtown businessman and property owner, and Mr. Burry, an architect, builder and restoration dreamer, have joined forces with a concept to transform one of the downtown’s most undesirable but historic eyesores, the Blue Gables, from a seedy rental property into something of vibrancy and potential.

  • We congratulate: Sen. Hornback did the right thing

    State Sen. Paul Hornback got it right, and he deserves our applause.

    Whether or not you think Sen. Hornback’s telecommunications deregulation bill – dubbed the “AT&T bill” in the corridors of his state Senate – was a good thing or a bad thing is not the issue here.

    What Sen. Hornback (R-Shelbyville) did that so many don’t do is this: He listened.

    He withdrew his bill on Thursday, and his reason for so doing was prime goodness: He said there was a public outcry against the bill.

  • Nearly 500 were touched

    Anyone who attended the Touched Twice Ministries’ free medical and hygienic clinic on Saturday would agree that the organizers thought of just about everything.

    Spread throughout three floors and basement of First Baptist Church Shelbyville on Midland Trail,  36 local businesses pitched in to provide services in everything from hairdressing to a thrift shop to counseling to personal hygiene.

    A wide range of medical services were provided as well, including chiropractic, dental, vision, and blood pressure and other screenings.

  • Shelbyville City Council holds public hearing

    Jewish Hospital officials were a no-show at a public hearing scheduled for Thursday before the Shelbyville City Council meeting.

    The Jewish Hospital representatives were supposed to have been there to talk about the refinancing of the hospital’s bonds, said Mayor Tom Hardesty.

    The council is not required to vote on the issue, but Hardesty, at the March 1 meeting of the council, encouraged members to attend in a show of support. But Hardesty said he had no idea beforehand that the hospital officials were not coming.