Today's News

  • EARLIER: Simpsonville’s new police chief: Familiar name makes history

    Chip Minnis sat in the room where he once spent second grade Wednesday and unwittingly wrote a chapter in history.

    Minnis, a lifelong resident of Simpsonville, was approved by the Simpsonville City Commission as the city’s new police chief, succeeding Scott Chappell.

    But the appointment of Minnis, 50, is a little bit bigger than just a change at the top of the city’s law enforcement: He becomes the first African-American to head a department of any kind in the history of the city.

  • Vietnam vet ‘graduates’ – 42 years after his class

  • Highlights of Pitino at Cardinal Caravan in Shelbyville

    Here are some of the highlights of University of Louisville men's basketball coach Rick Pitino's appearance at the Cardinal Caravan stop at the Shelby County Fairgrounds this past Thursday:

  • Odd little Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers now carve their lives outside Kentucky

    The federally endangered Red-Cockaded Woodpecker became extinct in Kentucky in approximately 2001.
    The accompanying photograph was taken in Pulaski County in Eastern Kentucky, where  a few nesting colonies remained alive.
    However, because of the severe droughts in the late 1990s, which caused many of the Short-Leaf Pine Trees to die, an infestation of the Southern Pine beetle that further devastated the pine trees, plus probably too much logging in the Daniel Boone National Forest, the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker had lost its habitat.

  • Shelby's Mark Wilson could be new Breeder's Cup CEO

    Mark Wilson, whose roots in Shelby County took him to a career in horse racing, is said to be one of two finalists to be CEO of the Breeders’ Cup.
    The Paulick Report, a Web site that tracks the horse racing industry, reported this week that Wilson, the former president of the TVG racing network, and Del Mar Thoroughbred Club president and general manager Craig Fravel had emerged from the field as the finish line approaches.

  • Business Briefcase: June 10, 2011

    Wiley financial center earns

    $65,000 grant for savings program

    The Hazel Joyce Wiley Career & Financial Literacy Institute in Shelbyville was one of 33 non-profits nationwide to receive an Assets for Independence grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    The $65,000, which will be used to create the Cornerstone IDA Program, was matched with major sponsorships from Republic Bank & Trust for $40,000, YLB Accounting & Consulting Services for $10,000 and Metro United Way for $1,500.

  • Budgeting to retire: You must start early

    The old adage “out of sight, out of mind” is never truer than when it comes to budgeting for retirement. Starting young is the best strategy.

    But typically, nothing is further from a young person’s mind, especially when they’re just starting a new career or forming a family.

  • SOUDER: The mother of all family feuds

    To some, the words “family feud” will bring to mind the old game show by that name, with Richard Dawson kissing all the female contestants.

    For the more literary astute, perhaps the Montagues and the Capulets from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet (or the more recent movie, Gnomeo and Juliet) came to mind. Still other’s thoughts may have gone to your latest holiday get-together.

  • News Briefs: June 10, 2011

    Repairs to KY 395

    to begin on Monday

    The long-awaited repairs to KY 395 near Waddy are about to begin.

    The state department of highways said the work, near the entrance to the Flying J Truck Stop on the north side of Interstate 64, would begin Monday and continue until Nov. 15.

    The adjustments call for improving the vertical and horizontal curve north of the Flying J, and a left-turn lane will also be constructed for motorists traveling south on KY 395 and entering the truck stop.

  • Victim's family to murderer Bancroft: 'Burn in hell'

    LAWRENCEBURG – Moments away from being sentenced to 70 years in prison, Gary Bancroft listened as family members of the woman he murdered had their say.

    Then Bancroft did the unthinkable: He smiled.

    That momentary smirk nearly ignited an already tension-wracked courtroom as deputies and family members had to restrain the slain woman’s father after he rose to his feet and yelled at Bancroft.