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Today's News

  • Guthrie says new rules unfair to Black & Decker

    U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-Bowling Green) is protesting a new regulation in the power tools industry because of its potential impact on the Black & Decker plant in Shelbyville.

    In a statement released by his office late last week, Guthrie shared a letter he had written to the Consumer Product Safety Commission to protest a proposal to expand safety standards in the production of power tools, and specifically table saws.

  • Business Briefcase: Jan. 27, 2012

    Republic reports 45 percent

    earnings growth in 2011

     

    Republic Bancorp, Inc., which has a branch in Shelbyville, announced its fourth consecutive year of increased earnings by completing 2011 with net income of $94.1 million, a $29.4 million, or 45 percent, increase over 2010.

  • 4th quarters decide Titans’ fates

    It was a tale of two different fourth quarters for the Collins boys’ basketball team this past weekend.

    Visiting Oldham County outscored the Titans by nine points in the final period on its way to a 58-44 victory Friday night. Then Collins turned the tables on host Christian Academy of Louisville on Saturday night, outpointing the Centurions by seven in the final 8 minutes of its 50-46 victory.

     

    Oldham County 58, Collins 44

  • Titans rally from 15-point halftime hole

    There was more than one reason to celebrate at Collins on Friday night.

    In addition to the Homecoming festivities, the Titans’ girls’ basketball team staged one of the biggest comebacks in its brief history.

    Collins, which trailed by 15 points at halftime, rallied to beat visiting Oldham County, 57-49.

  • Rockets rebound from blowout

    The Shelby County girls’ basketball continued to demonstrate its development over the weekend.

    The Rockets lost by 30 points, 58-28, to Owen County on Friday night but bounced back to beat host East Jessamine 52-43 Saturday in the school’s Coaches vs. Cancer Classic.

     

    Owen County 58, Shelby County 28

    The Rebels, one of the top teams in the 8th Region, led, 15-1, at the end of the first quarter on their way to the victory.

  • Poor shooting downs Rockets

    The struggles continued for the Shelby County boys’ basketball team this past weekend.

    The Rockets were routed by host North Oldham, 82-57, Friday night, then fell to North Laurel, 69-52, Saturday in the Al Prewitt Classic at Henry Clay.

     

    North Oldham 82, Shelby County 57

    The Mustangs, who led, 39-26, at halftime, used a huge third quarter – when they outscored Shelby, 31-12 – to put the visitors away.

  • 3 boys, 1 girl power Titans

    The Collins boys’ swim team beat both Meade County and Shelby County for a pair of dual-meet victories Saturday at Fort Knox.

    On the girls’ side, the Titans topped the Rockets but were edged by the Green Wave.

    Thanks to victories in six of the 11 events the Collins boys slipped past Meade, 115-114, and bettered Shelby, 144-63, while the Green Wave beat the Rockets, 127-62.

  • Shelby County School Board: Schools continue to study energy efficiencies

    With budget cuts from the state and funding issues locally, the Shelby County Board of Education will be looking for some good news with savings on energy.

    District Energy Manager Sherman Adams will provide the board with a presentation during Thursday's 7 p.m. meeting at Clear Creek Elementary School.

    Last August, Adams, who works for Shelby County and five other districts, gave the board excellent news with savings all over the district of 1.7 million kilowatt hours from the previous year.

  • Schools try to solve budget equation

    School districts around the state are contemplating Gov. Steve Beshear's budget proposal from last week and seeing how they can squeeze their budgets to fit within the cuts.

    Although Beshear has committed to funding at the same level as 2011-12, that doesn't take into account growth across the commonwealth.

    Per-pupil state funding is taking a hit, and in growth districts like Shelby County, that means stretching money over a bigger pool of students.

    Even the positives from Beshear's plan could hurt.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Downtown crackdown on 2-hour parking limit

    The city of Shelbyville is going to start cracking down in the 2-hour parking areas around the city.

    During Thursday's city council meeting, Mayor Tom Hardesty said there have been some parking issues around the new judicial center on Main Street and added that the public works department has been putting up new signs were some had been taken down or lost.

    City Engineer/Public Works Director Jennifer Herrell told the council that about 80 to 85 percent of the signs are up and that more have been ordered.