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Today's News

  • News Briefs: April 8, 2011

    School board calls

    special meetings

    The Shelby County Board of Education has added two special called meetings for next week.

    The board will meet at the district’s central office in closed session on Tuesday to discuss legal matters and for the private portion of the review of Superintendent James Neihof.

  • Olvera-Landaverde arraigned in drug trafficking charges

    Enrique Olvera-Landaverde, formerly of Shelbyville, was arraigned Thursday in Shelby District Court on a charge of trafficking in marijuana over 5 pounds.

    Olvera-Landaverde, 50,  had been sought since July, when Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies raided a house where he was living at 738 Southville Pike and found 800 pounds of marijuana and $63,000 in cash.

  • Shelbyville Police Reports April 8, 2011

    DUI

     

    Catherine M. Olvera, 38, of 1116 Kelley St. in Carrollton was arrested April 3 on Lee Nor Mack Street in Shelbyville and charged with operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs, first offense and no registration plates.

    Gustavo G. Hernandez, 25, of 171 Kentucky St. in Shelbyville was arrested April 3 at 1830 Midland Trail and charged with operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs, first offense, no operator’s license and no insurance.

  • Shelbyville resident charged with smuggling cigarettes into reformatory

    LA GRANGE – He told prison guards they were ankle braces.

    James H. Petrey of Shelbyville is charged with promoting contraband by delivering tobacco to inmates at the Kentucky State Reformatory for $350 per pound.

    But just before his arrest, Petrey, 62, was working as a teacher at the Kentucky State Reformatory and admitted to police that he had a pound of tobacco pressed, bundled and taped to each foot.

    To read more, click here:

    http://www.oldhamera.com/content/teacher-banked-144000-weekly-tobacco-de...

  • Cozzens finishes 11th in geography bee

    In a repeat trip to the state National Geographic Bee, Paul Cozzens of Shelbyville, a seventh-grader at Corpus Christi Academy in Simpsonville, finished 11th out of 95 competing participants April 1.

    Falling just one question short of the final round, Cozzens achieved his goal of “making it to the tiebreaker round.”

  • Superb IPC gets preliminary approval for $400,000 incentive package

    A Shelbyville company has plans to upgrade its equipment and more than double its work force within the next 12 months, thanks to a $400,000 state economic development tax incentive.

    Kentucky Government Steve Beshear made the announcement at the plant, Super IPC, on Wednesday, that the company will hire 20 new employees, more than doubling the plant's current number of 15.

    The plant does powder coating for the automotive industry, as well as electrical and gas companies, yard and office furniture and toerh metal-related industies.

  • Simpsonville must request new bids on sidewalk project

    The residents of Simpsonville may soon come to believe they are traveling down a yellow-brick road on the path to their new downtown sidewalks.

    City officials continue to wrangle with the state review process on the $320,000 federal stimulus grant the city was awarded more than a year ago for new sidewalks it would build along the south side of U.S. 60 between Veechdale Road and Fairview Drive.

  • Easter celebrations

    Bagdad Baptist
    Easter Sunday services will be: 8:30, early service; 9, breakfast; 10, Sunday school; 10:45, Easter service. The youth will have a fundraiser dinner theater 6-8 p.m. on April 30 performing the play Virgil’s First Easter while serving dinner.  The youth are accepting donations and selling tickets. For tickets, call 502- 747-8933.  
    Beechridge

  • WICHE: Raised beds in the garden are a good way to go

    One dilemma facing many aspiring vegetable gardeners is sub-prime soil, shall we say.

    Compacted, clayey soil is not uncommon in Kentuckiana, but it is especially common in newer developments. One way to off-set the problem is to employ a system of raised beds.

    Raised beds are practical for many reasons, and they are not just for the clay-challenged!

    They are practical because you do not have to till, dig, double dig or battle clay in a raised bed. The soil has been added by you, so it is as good as you want it to be.

  • News Briefs: April 6, 2011

    New poll shows that state’s

    uninsured numbers declining

    A new poll conducted by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky says that the number of Kentuckians without insurance is declining.

    The group’s most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll showed that about one out of four adults (ages 18-64) – 26 percent – were uninsured in 2010, which is down from 33 percent in 2009 and on pace with 2008.