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Today's News

  • How about a little faith for the holidays?

    For years, when asked what I wanted for a Christmas gift, I offered the same canned but heartfelt item:
    Peace on earth and good will toward men.

    Could there be a better present than wanting the world to reach its serene and sincere summit? I mean, what could compare? A new Countess Mara (look it up) or a sleeve of Titleists or one of those hot cars so many folks in commercials seem to receive?

    No, I thought nothing under the tree could be greater – until now.

  • What we think: Review or repeal shock probation

    Why is shock probation part of the judicial landscape in Kentucky?

    There are only seven states that have such a program, which allow judges to release from prison convicted criminals – many of them felons – simply because they have faced the “shock” of life in a cell.

    Why does Kentucky’s having shock probation seem to be such a disservice to law enforcement, prosecutors and the judicial process in general?

  • NEIHOF: Giving gifts that last

    There is a scene in the movie Fred Clausin which Fred (played by Vince Vaughn) is responsible for determining which child makes the Nice List or which child makes the Naughty List. The older brother of Santa Claus tires of the situation and the choice process, so he stamps each and every child as Nice, meaning each and every child receives what he or she wants.

    I must be Fred Claus.

  • MY WORD: Think, shop and buy in Shelby County

    When dollars are spent in Shelby County, they can in turn be invested locally, raising the overall level of economic activity, paying more salaries and building the local tax base. This recirculation of money leads to an increase of economic activity, with the degree of expanse entirely dependent on the percentage of money spent locally.

    Buying away from home means lost revenue for local businesses and your tax dollars going to support some other community. I refer to the lost of potential-local retail sales, as “retail leakage.”

  • Fast asks for shock probation

    Joshua Fast of Crestwood, sentenced in June to second-degree burglary and reckless homicide, has asked to be considered for shock probation.

    Shelby County Circuit Judge Charles Hickman sentenced Fast in June to 10 years in prison, 5 years for the homicide charge and 5 years for the burglary, for his participation in the events surrounding the shooting death of David Fletcher of Shelbyville in October 2008.

  • Betty Thom: 1936-2011

    A stunning death has taken the life of a well-known musician and folk singer who lived near Simpsonville.

    Betty Thom, one of the original founding members of the folk/bluegrass group, The Cumberlands, passed away in her sleep, said her husband of 55 years, Harold Thom.

    “She was the most wonderful, loving, compassionate, kind, brilliant lady,” he said. “She was one in a billion.”

  • True blue and Santa, too

    The weather wasn’t quite delightful, but neither was it frightful Saturday at the Christmas Parade, an event that had a specific theme this year.

    Touted as the Red, White and Blue American Christmas, the parade down Main Street featured 20 floats, up a few from last year, many of which featured patriotic themes, a couple of them depicting Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001.

  • Woman sentenced in murder-for-hire gets shock probation

    A woman who tried to set up her former fiancé’s murder has been released from jail on shock probation after serving about six months of a 10-year sentence.
     

    Tracy Sandoval, 23, of Frankfort was sentenced in July after she pleaded guilty to criminal solicitation to commit murder.

    Commonwealth’s Attorney Larry Cleveland opposed the motion for shock probation filed by Sandoval’s attorney, Max Comley.

    “Had her wishes been carried out...Antonio Cruz would be dead right now,” Cleveland said.

  • VAN STOCKUM: Peace and War, The Path to World War II Part 2: The people, events that took us to Pearl Harbor

    Maj. John W. Thomason was perhaps the first Marine to gain prominence outside military circles as an artistic and literary figure. As a major at the San Diego Marine Barracks in 1939, he was highly respected and greatly admired.

    We second lieutenants had enjoyed his stories of marines in combat, including those in his popular book Fix Bayonets, which were based upon his experiences in combat with the Marine Brigade in France in 1918.

  • EARLIER: Shelby police officers not held to fitness standards

    On a tragic afternoon at a house in Shelbyville last month, two Shelbyville Police Officers grappled with a teenager who they say was hitting them with a variety of items.

    Both officers were struck, one severely, before, police said, a female officer drew her gun and shot and killed 18-year-old Trey F. Williams.

    Among the many questions that emerged from that confrontation, in which two officers apparently failed to subdue one younger and larger individual, is this: How physically fit are the men and women trained to protect and serve the citizens?