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Today's News

  • Sharpshooter Davis hits primary target

    Connor Davis has always had his sights set on the University of Kentucky.

    Monday this Shelby County senior officially has cast his lot with the Wildcats.

    Davis signed to join the UK rifle team in the high school’s library.

    “I’ve always been a UK fan, I couldn’t see myself rooting for another school,” said Davis, wearing a black short-sleeve shirt with a blue UK logo on it. “It’s pretty cool.”

  • Fielding powers runner-up Titans

    LEXINGTON – Moments after finishing eighth in the boys’ Class 2A State Cross Country meet, Collins junior Devon Fielding walked back toward his team’s tent carrying a large Titans’ flag.

    He stopped and placed it in the ground.

    Saturday was a flag-planting day for Collins, as Fielding and his Titans teammates continued to break new ground.

  • Gabby Karas wins in Sister Act II

    LEXINGTON – One Karas began what could be a long, historic run into Kentucky cross-country history Saturday, while the other finished her own impressive run into the state record books.

    Sisters Gabby and Caterina Karas, a seventh-grader and a senior at Collins High School, respectively, finished 1-2 in the girls’ Class 2A State Cross Country meet at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. 

  • Francis Maurice ‘Frank’ Goodwin: 1932-2011

    Frank Goodwin literally and figuratively put the Budd Company on the map in Shelbyville.

    Not only was he the first plant manager for the company when it finally opened its doors in 1987, but he was also instrumental in building the site near Interstate 64 that is now Martinrea Heavy Stamping.

  • Firefighter Floyd named top Shelbyville's employee

    Rickie Floyd said he likes being a firefighter so much that he did it for free for the first five years.

    That kind of dedication is just part of the reason that Floyd, now with the Shelbyville Fire Department, was named the Shelbyville Employee of the Year for 2011.

    "They left me speechless," Floyd said. "I usually talk a lot, but I didn't know what to say on that."

    Floyd started with the fire department in 1987 as a volunteer and finally got on fulltime in Feb. 1992.

  • Shelby County School Board: No visible work on Collins’ field

    Shelby County Public Schools is preparing to find out more this week about the scheduled repair work for Collins High School’s multipurpose field.

    The topic is sure to stay in the forefront as the Board of Education gets back on track with a full meeting Thursday, coincidentally at Collins.

    Although the field is not on the agenda, the board and Superintendent James Neihof surely will have questions.

  • The men who failed the boys

    They gathered there, at midfield of a football stadium, before more than 100,000 witnesses. They joined hands, oversized men in black, white and red. Their loyalties and potential animosity had been deposited on their sidelines.

    Their heads were bowed, and they were praying.

  • What we think: Beshear, Williams must compromise

    We now know that Steve Beshear gets another four years to run Kentucky. An overwhelming plurality of statewide voters thought he had done a good enough job to deserve an encore.

    And there also was a strong endorsement in Shelby County, which was a small surprise considering that Republicans have dominated the top-of-the-ticket races among our voters for the past few elections.

  • What we think: Celebration of Lights is too early

    We love the holiday season and all that it represents. We are glad so many in our county embrace that season and present many wonderful opportunities to celebrate. But we have a suggestion:

    The Celebration of Lights is celebrated too early.

    This community festival, the county’s largest, is a wonderful event to bring the public to downtown Shelbyville, to erect the city’s Christmas tree and to light up the season.

    But we think its scheduling nearly two weeks before Thanksgiving is out of perspective.

  • Roads are deerly dangerous for drivers

    It’s that time of year again that deer and deer hunters alike dream about – the mating season.

    And deer biologists are reporting that Shelby County remains one of the 36 counties with the highest concentrations of deer – with 30 or more per square mile.

    That may sound like deer heaven for the hunters, but it could spell disaster for motorists.