Today's News

  • Basketball coach Turley leaves Collins for job he ‘can’t pass up’

    Curtis Turley has resigned as Collins’ boys' basketball coach after one season.

    Under Turley the Titans went 18-12 in their inaugural campaign, which ended with a 52-49 loss to Henry County in the first round of the 8th Region Tournament.

    "He's had an opportunity he felt like he couldn't turn down," Collins Principal Anthony Hatchell said Monday afternoon.

    "It's not high school [coaching]," Turley added, although he didn't get any more specific, when reached Monday afternoon.

  • His life is a lot to Crowe about

    If you don't know Crowe, you don't know athletics in this county.

    Or its unofficial mayor.

    Crowe, for the likely few of you who may not know, is Austin Crowe.

    This 19-year-old, who graduated with honors from Collins this past Saturday night, has reached one-name status through his managing of athletic teams at Shelby County and Collins high schools, his tireless work ethic, his infectious smile and personality and for just being an all-around good guy.

  • Court report: June 8, 2011

    District court

    The following cases were heard by Judge Donna Dutton:

    Jeffrey T. Hinkle, operating on suspended/revoked operator's license - guilty - 20-day sentence and $143 costs.

    Samuel Ruiz, third-degree criminal possession of forged instrument - guilty - 12-month sentence probated for two years and $144 costs.

  • Cornerstone seniors earn $669,356 in aid

    Cornerstone Christian Academy graduated a class of eight Saturday afternoon at First Baptist Church.

    Those seven earned a staggering $669,356 in scholarship money, including Valedictorian Kaitlyn Grunder and Audra Cronen's scholarships, worth about $175,000 each.

    All seven graduates earned some scholarship money, ranging from Grunder and Cronen to $2,500 grants.

    The following seniors, listed with their diploma, graduated:

    Lyla Abild – general diploma

    Tiffany Aldridge – advanced college prep diploma

  • GRADUATION 2011: The final rite of a new era

    Words such as ecstatic, happy, proud and excited were tossed around, with quotes from Dr. Seuss, Christopher Robin and Nemo that focused on grasping the future ahead.

    On Saturday, Shelby County’s first double graduation day in more than 30 years went off without a hitch.

    There may have been two classes graduating, but the excitement came from Simpsonville, Shelbyville, Bagdad, Pleasureville and Waddy, with several of the same faces turning up at both commencements — including both parents and students.

  • Shelby’s contributions to Crusade decline

    Shelby County’s fire departments, other organizations and countless volunteers helped raise more than $5 million for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children.

    In its 58th year, the Crusade raised $5,301,881, topping 2010’s total of $5,301,182 – with $56,437.33 coming from collections in Shelby, based on information on the Crusade’s Web site.

    “The community really stepped up because it’s been a couple rough years,” said Dawn Lee, president of the Crusade.

  • Annual health fair offers free screenings

    JHS Men’s Health Fair

    What:Free health screenings for men

    When:8 a.m.-noon, Saturday

    Where:Jewish Hospital Shelbyville

    Appointment scheduling: Call 502-647-4341 or visit www.jhsmh.org/menshealthfair

    When Tony Carriss was diagnosed with prostate cancer and treated, he realized helping other men’s health was an important proactive step for the fight against cancer.

  • What we think: Mount Eden in real danger of losing its post office

    Citizens in Mount Eden, on both sides of the Shelby and Spencer county lines, are putting up the good fight against what ultimately may be the most overpowering opponent other than death that any of us will face: the United States government.
    They fear – and with good cause – that they will lose their venerable post office to the aggressive cost-cutting plan that the United States Postal Service is employing to combat the diminishing income of its once great monopoly.

  • We congratulate: New intersection – with some caution

    It should be automatic to celebrate the quick and forthright repairs made to the intersection of U.S. 60 and KY 55, a problem area long before the opening of the Shelbyville Bypass and an excruciatingly worse one since.
    State transportation officials responded purposefully to the public outcry generated through these pages and escalated with the firm voices of state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and retired state Sen. Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville).

  • A touch of class: Note to 2011 graduates, check out this record

    For the first time in nearly four decades, Shelby County Public Schools graduated two classes of  seniors on Saturday.
    Though these teenagers traversed the threshold from child/student to adult in a simple march across a podium and in the gentle grasp of an administrator’s hand, the final understanding of how far they have come, how much they learned and can accomplish, won’t be on life’s diploma until, oh, a few decades from now.