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Today's News

  • Solid pitching boosts Titans to 4-1 start

    For the Collins baseball team two out of three wasn’t bad Saturday. In fact it was good enough.

    The Titans improved to 4-1 on the young season with a 3-2 victory at North Bullitt.

    “Right now, we’re usually doing two out of three things well,” Collins Coach Roy Bailey said. “One game we’ll hit and pitch well. Another game we’ll hit and field well. We’re just trying to get all three phases together.”

  • Rockets take the wood to 2 foes, fall in semis

    The Shelby County baseball team took to the wood pretty good this past weekend.

    The Rockets went 2-1 in the Jim Dougherty Memorial Tournament at Bellevue, an event in which the teams used wooden bats.

    Shelby County (7-3) won its first two games before falling to fellow 8th Region team Walton-Verona on Sunday morning in the tournament semifinals.

     

    SCHS 12, Silver Grove 1 (5 inn.)

    The Rockets ran over the Big Trains (0-6 at that point) in their first game Saturday morning, pounding out 13 hits.

  • 2 new ways you can help

    The Shelbyville Citizen’s Advisory Board is diving headfirst in to a couple of projects its members believe will benefit the city.

    The board, which was organized by Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte a little more than five years ago, is organizing a coat drive and will have a bike rodeo in May.

    It may seem like an odd time of the year to have a coat and blanket drive, but board member Ann Morris described it as kind of a spring-cleaning for winter.

  • City gives 1st OK for annexation of bowling center

    The Shelbyville City Council took the first step for annexation of the property where the former Bluegrass Bowling Center now sits.

    The council voted unanimously in favor on the first reading of annexation at Thursday’s special called meeting. The second reading will be at another special called meeting on April 19.

    The move could pave the way for the county’s only bowling alley to reopen.

  • EARLIER: Shelbyville's sidewalk ordinance: ‘Unfair, unwise…illegal’

    A group of business and property owners finally had their say in front of the Shelbyville City Council during Thursday’s special called meeting at city hall.

    The group was formed in opposition to the city’s sidewalk ordinance, which calls for property owners to repair sidewalks along their property when they fall into disrepair.

  • What we think: Bullitt's bold ban of smoking in public places inspires action

    You may have read recently about a bold new policy decision rendered in Bullitt County.
    Bullitt’s Board of Health voted to make all publicly accessed facilities in the county – including some parks and outdoor areas – smoke free.
    We find this an intriguing step in the debate between smokers’ rights and the greater good of public health. Their concept also is far more wide-ranging and stringent than policies passed by legislative bodies across Kentucky.

  • We congratulate: More good news for Shelby County's economy

    The preliminary approval of state incentives announced Thursday for Ficosa North America is the latest in a surge of terrific economic news for Shelby County.
    Following announced plans at Martinrea Heavy Stamping, Katayama and Shelby Industries, we are now up to four the number of companies that will be adding jobs in the coming years.

  • MY WORD: Cutting Medicaid is no place to start with state budget

    I am writing to express my disappointment in local politicians for supporting the proposed 35 percent, across-the-boards reduction in Kentucky Medicaid services. Do they fully understand the impact this would have on our most frail and vulnerable population?

  • Animal fundraiser bites 1 participant

    Officials of a local animal support group have expressed dissatisfaction with the way the proceeds were divided from a fundraiser that included all animal rescue organizations in Shelby County.

    The Monarchs, Mutts & Meows, an overflow event at Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Feb. 12, generated about $15,000 that was to have been divided among the Shelby County Humane Society, the No-Kill Mission, Operation Catsnip Woodstock and Lifebridge for Animals.

  • ‘A new twist on an old story’

    Richard Luebbert pauses as he considers how to describe his first book, just off the presses and already in a second printing:

    “Well, it’s about Jesus,” he says simply.

    The book is called, a little less simply, Jesus for the 21st Century, The Unified Gospel, which Luebbert describes as a “new look at the old, old story.”

    The book, which he will display at a signing April 21 at the Shelby County Public Library, is the combined gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John arranged in a new way