.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Smith named SCPS deputy superintendent

    Lisa Smith is moving on and up but not out of Shelby County Public Schools.

    Effective July 1, Smith will move from director of student programs to chief academic officer/deputy superintendent for SCPS.

    Smith, who has been a teacher in Franklin County and a principal and administrator in Shelby, said originally leaving the classroom was difficult.

  • Easter eggs sunny side down

    Mother Nature might have slowed him down, but she couldn't stop the Easter bunny on Saturday.

    As rain continued to drown the region this weekend, many egg hunts were canceled or moved inside.

    But it didn't stop the Finchville Ruritan Club from having its annual egg hunt around the old Finchville school.

    "My kids love it," Jeanine Barrett said. "They think it's more fun in the rain."

  • Teen’s ‘confession’ leads to rape charges

    A man is in jail under a $150,000 cash bond after being arrested for first-degree rape and sodomy of a child.

    Abel V. Gomez, 29, was arrested April 18 at the McDonald’s restaurant on Frankfort Road after the pastor of a teen-aged girl reported to a child abuse hotline the details of what the pastor said she had told him, police said.

  • Republicans continue surge in registrations

    The official voter registration numbers for next month’s Primary Election are not yet available, but early reports indicate the migration of Democratic voters to the Republican rolls in Shelby County has continued.

    The most recent report received by Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry from the state board of elections, which is complete through March, showed there were 26,662 registered voters in Shelby County, with the Democrats’ hold as the dominating party down to little more than  4,000 registrants.

  • Shelbyville Police Reports, April 27, 2011

    DUI

    Scott Adrian Dale, 30, of 11515 Willow Stream Court in Louisville was arrested April 9 at Mack Walters at Bridlewood and charged with operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol, second offense, under aggravating circumstances.

    William A. Goodwin, 23, of 12107 Cropper Road in Pleasureville was arrested April 10 on KY 1790 and charged with operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugs, first offense.

     

    Traffic

  • When it comes to our weather, it’s hard to get the picture

    Wednesday. 12:30 a.m. The tornado sirens are blaring through the wind and rain outside and windows closed against them. My wife’s voice is equally rousing, and I spring from my bed to see what is the matter.

    We grabbed up the kids and scurried to the basement, opened the door slightly and turned on the TV to track whatever mayhem was causing those sirens to blare.

    I’m sure many of you did the same, alerted, awakened and ambulated into early morning emergency response mode.

  • What we think: We must fund I-64 ramp repair

    You had to be pleased and heartened by the news that the frighteningly short and deadly ramp from KY 55 onto eastbound Interstate 64 was on tap for repair within the next year.

    That’s what state transportation engineer Matt Bullock told Shelby County Fiscal Court, and we believe Mr. Bullock would not have been so public with his comments if the schedule were not indeed set in at least asphalt.

  • We congratulate: Circuit Court Clerk Lowry Miller's decision about Ten Commandments

    The debate about whether the Ten Commandments should be displayed in governmental buildings is predictable because of its foundation in the conflict of human emotions and beliefs against legal interpretations by the courts.

    When letter writer Linda Allewalt last week again raised the issue about whether the commandments should be posted visibly in government offices in Shelby County, the response from many was equally expected: We believe in these commandments, and they are the foundation for our laws. Thus, they should be displayed.

  • MY WORD: Could we agree on posting these Four Commandments?

    During the past several decades, we have had a number of court rulings:

    §       School-sponsored prayer or Bible reading.

    §       Removal of creches from public property.

    §       Ending the Pledge of Allegiance as mandatory.

    §       Removal of the Ten Commandments from public property.

  • MY WORD: 10 reasons why the commandments should come down

    I wholeheartedly support Linda Allewalt in her efforts concerning removal of the Ten Commandments from the walls of Shelbyville’s government buildings (“Ten Commandments must come down,” April 20).

    I don't understand the reluctance in taking it down – unless it's a daily reminder to the religious government employees who might forget? Let's go through the list itself as it

    might apply to a government building: