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Today's News

  • CUB donates parcels for downtown project

    The idea of a new downtown convention center has taken a step forward.

    Citizens Union Bank announced the donation of two parcels of land – the two “shotgun” houses at 818 and 820 Washington Street, adjacent to CUB’s branch at 9th and Main  – to the project.

  • Shelby County School Board: School review workshops begin Thursday

    The Shelby County Board of Education will launch three consecutive weeks of meetings with a workshop at 6 p.m. Thursday at Central Office, workshop meetings will follow on Nov. 3 and Nov. 10.

    In these sessions the board will hear school achievement reports from each individual school, starting with Clear Creek, Heritage, Painted Stone and Simpsonville elementary schools this week.

  • Thousands taken in break-in on Benson

    More than $8,000 worth of property was stolen from a home on Benson Pike early in the month.

    Between Oct. 5 and Oct. 9, in the 6100 block of Benson Pike, someone broke into a residence by using forced entry through the front door.

    Property stolen included several rifles and shotguns, jewelry and a jewelry box, musical instruments, a coke can coin bank, a weed eater with a metal blade, a Western roping saddle, a compound bow, and a black powder pistol.

  • Shelby County Sheriff's Reports Oct. 26, 2011

    Warrants

     

    Kenneth Riddle, 47, of 435 E.  Brandies Ave. in Louisville was served Sept. 6 at the Detention Center with a Jefferson County warrant for flagrant nonsupport.

    Amelia F. Meadows, 50, of 635 Booker Pike was arrested Sept. 6 on 5th Street on a Henry County warrant for probation violation on a misdemeanor offense.

    Robert Mitchell Spangler, 58, of 406 Pine Creek Road in Mayking  was served Sept. 8 at the Detention Center with a Virginia warrant for being a fugitive from another state.

  • Witchy woman loves halloween

    She’s been described as a “good witch,” and those who see her around town this week will surely agree.

    Every year, the entire week leading up to Halloween, Linda Ethington gets all decked out in her witch garb whenever she goes anywhere, even to the grocery store, she said.

    “Everybody knows I’m crazy, and they just love it,” she said with a giggle.

  • Court report 10/26/11

    District court

    The following cases were heard by Judge Kevin Delahanty:

    Kristopher L. Bryant, operating on suspended/revoked operator's license – pleaded guilty – 10-day sentence, serve 5 days and $393 fine and costs.

    Edy A. Arturo, failure to wear seat belts, no operator's/moped license and first-offense failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance – pleaded guilty – 30-day sentence conditionally discharged for 2 years and $918 fine and costs.

  • What we think: Montell's bill deserves a look

    State Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) last week took a new and hopeful stab at addressing a problem that we all recognize and rebuke: the hiring of illegal immigrants.

    His proposal – to require those most likely to hire undocumented workers to go through a specific process of ensuring the legal residency of those individuals – is not entirely original, but it at least keeps open the discussion of an idea that could help solve a problem that costs our country, state and county millions of tax dollars annually.

  • We congratulate: Equestrian Burnett for Pan Am silver

    It makes sense that the horse industry would bring Shelby County serious recognition in the big-time international sports arena.

    On Sunday in Mexico, Hannah Sue Burnett, formerly of Finchville, staked a claim to a spot in the 2012 U.S. Olympics by winning a silver medal in eventing at the Pan American Games.

    Ms. Burnett, who was no worse than third aboard Harbour Pilot throughout the 3-day competition, also was the highest-ranking scorer on the gold-medal-winning U.S. team.

  • Don't fail to see the fall foreest for all the beautiful trees

    I absorbed the very little I know about trees from living beside them, beneath them and seeking their shade on a hot summer days, invading their fortress of darkness, where a boy could pretend he was hiding from the good guys or hunting the bad ones, and later enduring those cursed magnets that lured his errant golf balls to their deep, dark, deadly jungles.

  • MY WORD: Elementary students are planning for the future

    If you went to Northside or Southside Elementary in the late 1950s, you were asked along with every other child “what do you want to be when you grow up?”

    The typical answers were (and note the gender of that era of thinking): fireman, policeman, teacher or a mama. Later in the 1960s, after John Glenn circled the globe, some children added being an astronaut.