Today's News

  • Drug court graduate

    On May 19, Sharon Farris (third from left) graduated from Shelby County Drug Court. She is shown here with C.L. Jordan, recovery coordinator (left), Elizabeth M. Nichols, program supervisor (second from left), Judge Charles R. Hickman, drug court judge (second from right) and Tonya Leathers, case specialist (right).

  • A road more traveled can take us back to days of dads

    On a sunny Friday afternoon, the damnations of work behind you and the blessings of a weekend settling large on your horizon, you find yourself winding down a road that is as familiar as the scars in your own skin, one whose hills, dales and dusty side trails you can see perfectly with your eyes shut and nothing but motion to plot its passage.
    Each fencepost is a milestone of your journey, a dot on your mind’s map so large and bold that you can name generations of people – their nicknames, their offspring, their ancestors – who lived behind them.

  • What we think: Shelby County Fair Board has been more than fair

    It’s really a positive in a community when decision-makers listen to public input and respond appropriately.
    That’s why it was refreshing to hear last week about the aggressive changes that the Shelby County A&M board had adopted for the upcoming Shelby County Fair.
    Last year the fair had come under significant criticism because of its high prices for admission and ride bracelets and for its restrictive gate practices.
    Those complaints were well-founded and – much  more importantly – well-received.

  • We congratulate: Shelby County's timely new jail deal

    The swift and positive reaction by Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits and the county’s magistrates to an opportunity for new business will provide an important infusion of cash into a county budget that is becoming difficult to balance.
    Waits was quick to respond earlier this spring to a brief openinig to secure a $600,000 contract with Anderson County to house its inmates.

  • MY WORD: Monumental fun can make a big difference

    In communities across the nation, cemeteries are dying.
    That’s what happens when the living fail to honor, preserve and restore their local cemeteries. It’s also the result when cemetery boards fail to keep the cemetery alive and vital by investing in surrounding property for the future and providing opportunities for the living to honor and preserve the resting place of the dead.
    Grove Hill Cemetery in the center of Shelby County is alive and well.

  • EARLIER: Simpsonville’s new police chief: Familiar name makes history

    Chip Minnis sat in the room where he once spent second grade Wednesday and unwittingly wrote a chapter in history.

    Minnis, a lifelong resident of Simpsonville, was approved by the Simpsonville City Commission as the city’s new police chief, succeeding Scott Chappell.

    But the appointment of Minnis, 50, is a little bit bigger than just a change at the top of the city’s law enforcement: He becomes the first African-American to head a department of any kind in the history of the city.

  • Vietnam vet ‘graduates’ – 42 years after his class

  • Highlights of Pitino at Cardinal Caravan in Shelbyville

    Here are some of the highlights of University of Louisville men's basketball coach Rick Pitino's appearance at the Cardinal Caravan stop at the Shelby County Fairgrounds this past Thursday:

  • Odd little Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers now carve their lives outside Kentucky

    The federally endangered Red-Cockaded Woodpecker became extinct in Kentucky in approximately 2001.
    The accompanying photograph was taken in Pulaski County in Eastern Kentucky, where  a few nesting colonies remained alive.
    However, because of the severe droughts in the late 1990s, which caused many of the Short-Leaf Pine Trees to die, an infestation of the Southern Pine beetle that further devastated the pine trees, plus probably too much logging in the Daniel Boone National Forest, the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker had lost its habitat.

  • Shelby's Mark Wilson could be new Breeder's Cup CEO

    Mark Wilson, whose roots in Shelby County took him to a career in horse racing, is said to be one of two finalists to be CEO of the Breeders’ Cup.
    The Paulick Report, a Web site that tracks the horse racing industry, reported this week that Wilson, the former president of the TVG racing network, and Del Mar Thoroughbred Club president and general manager Craig Fravel had emerged from the field as the finish line approaches.