Today's News

  • Shelby man taking steps to create fitness trail

    Visitors to Red Orchard Park soon will notice exercise equipment placed along the park’s various hiking trails, including Bluebird Trail.

    Some may think the exercise equipment is for the birds, but it’s actually being installed for adults who want to work out while taking their kids or grandkids to the park, Parks and Recreation Director Clay Cottongim said.

  • EARLIER: Murder suspect arrested in Arizona

    Six months after the murder of an Anderson County woman left her cats homeless in the care of her vet in Shelby County, the man wanted in connection with her death has been apprehended in Arizona.

    A Kentucky State Police press release said Terrance Cram was taken into custody Wednesday in Goodyear, Ariz.

    Cram, 49, had been indicted by an Anderson County Grand Jury on June 7, charging him with the murder of Tena McNeely, tampering with physical evidence and fraudulent use of a credit card.

  • How the cemetery is kept alive

    Since 1854, Grove Hill Cemetery has served the Shelby County community as a leading place of rest for the dead, and under the earth at the cemetery lie 18,000 different stories, Cemetery Board Chairman Charles Long said.

    The cemetery is a 501(c)(13) nonprofit company, operated and owned by its members, who are those who have purchased gravesites.

    Being a 501(c)(13) means the cemetery doesn’t have to pay any sales tax on the items it buys for the cemetery, Grove Hill Cemetery Superintendent Mark Brooks said.

  • Dairy show kicks off fair

    Despite the heat and beating sun, the Shelbyville Dairy Show kicked off the Shelby County Fair Thursday afternoon.

    Vice President of the Shelby County A&M Association Ray Tucker said Thursday afternoon was a day for setting up and completing all the attractions, with most of the activities getting started in the evening.

    However, the Dairy Show sponsored by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture drew in a large crowd.

  • Shelby vet’s novel idea is published

    Shelby County native Drew Howell put his pen to paper and churned out a “gripping tale of counterterrorism, covert intelligence, heroism, duty and betrayal” that is slowly working its way into bookstores and onto shelves.

    Expendable Assets is Howell’s first book but it certainly won’t be the last book, he said.

    "This story is not finished,” he said. "I'm starting to put together ideas all ready."

    And he has no shortage of sources for them.

  • Simpsonville is getting a new fire chief

    The bad news is that the Simpsonville Fire Department had to trim its budget a bit, enough to merit cutting out a key position, that of administrative assistant.

    The good news is that Fire Chief Walter Jones has found a solution to the problem.

    He has stepped down as fire chief but will stay on as administrative assistant, a position that his wife, Kathy, had occupied.

    In his place, Assistant Chief Ronnie Sowder will step up as part-time fire chief.

  • Horse show again among top events

    For the second year in a row, the Shelbyville Horse Show has been ranked in the top 10 among summer tourism events in the state.

    Katie Fussenegger, executive director for the Shelbyville/Shelby County Tourism Commission Visitors Bureau, said there are generally 50 to 75 events nominated to be in the top 10. From those, 10 are “deemed worthy,” she said.

    Judges look at three categories, which are how long the event has been in existence, popularity and its relation to the state’s tourism and economy.

  • Bird of a different sort

    James Bowman and Aaron DeFlippo from Kentucky Down Under, showed Children at the Library on Thursday afternoon, native Australian animals such as a lizard, jungle carpet snake, cocobarra bird and a kangaroo.

  • Gaither named new Collins boys' basketball coach

    Chris Gaither has been hired as Collins' second boys' basketball coach.

    Gaither, 27, previously assisted Mike Clark at Shelby County for two seasons before working under Curtis Turley this past season for the Titans' inaugural campaign. 

    "Mr. Gaither has been an assistant in our program for three years under very successful mentors," Collins Principal Anthony Hatchell said Thursday.  

    For more see Friday's edition of The Sentinel-News.

  • WICHE: Get to know your beneficial insects

    Before you squish, consider the next generation of beneficial insects that you may be eliminating from your garden. We have come to look at all insects as bad, which is far from the truth.

    We delight over butterflies but likely kill many while in the caterpillar stage; we love lady beetles, but the nymph stage looks a little scary; and we swat and spray ever fly, wasp and bee in ear-shot.