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Today's News

  • Triple S Planning Commission: 2 more zone changes to get 1st consideration

    Already having faced a summer of significant and controversial zoning decisions, the Triple S Planning Commission on Tuesday night will entertain two more requests for zone changes, along with some other adjustments in plans.

    The zoning requests are for businesses at opposite ends of the county and concern familiar pieces of property.

    The first is for Purnell Sausage in Simpsonville, which seeks to change a parcel it owns adjacent to its main plant from commercial to light industrial.

  • Shelby woman recognized by KSP

    Laura Monroe (center), daughter of Shelbyville residents Carla and the late Hart Winans, received Monday a Commercial Vehicle Support Award from Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer (right) and Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary J. Michael Brown. A 10-year KSP employee, Monroe is an administrative specialist III with the KSP commercial vehicle enforcement division in Frankfort.

  • Deadly stretch of I-64 gets fix

    A highway construction project to correct a deadly stretch of Interstate 64 is nearing an end.

    Andrea Clifford, public information officer for the Transportation Cabinet’s District 5, said the construction in the westbound lane in the vicinity of Mile Marker 38, which began Oct. 3, is expected to be completed next week.

  • Halloween horrors set to tickle spines

    Halloween is creeping closer, and annual events designed to provide a scare or two are popping up on the calendar.

    In addition to the Trunk Or Treat events that have become popular at churches around Shelby County, the annual scare-you-to-death fundraisers are now open.

    Back for its fourth season, the Blood Orchard Curse is offering scary tours Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight at Red Orchard Park on Kentucky Street.

    The costs is  $10 per person, and proceeds go to the Shelby County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Businesses, organizations team up to present anti-bully program

    TAYLORSVILLE – Jaime Evans knows what it's like to be bullied.

    As a high school freshman, she was bullied by a group of six girls who would often start fist fights.

    "I would be walking down the hallway and a girl would literally come up and push me," Evans said.

    Once, the group even called her mother and said they had Evans in their custody and planned to fatally attack her.

    Evans actually wasn't with those girls, but she wasn't home, so her mother didn't know what was going on.

  • UNDERWOOD: Transformational lessons for coaches

    Take a trip out to Clear Creek Park on a most any evening or Saturday morning almost any time of the year and you will hear and see hundreds of young people participating in their favorite sport. Moreover, their parents are cheering them on, while coaches of all ages, shapes and sizes blow their whistles and shout out instructions.

    As I sat on a recent Saturday morning watching this phenomena, I couldn’t help but think back about the many good and bad experiences I had growing up and how coaches and parents played a part in each.

  • New Business: Friends Salon

    Address: 7205 Shelbyville Road, Simpsonville

     

    Who we are: Owners/Stylists Darlene Taylor and Teresa Adcock along with Maggie Riggs have a combined total of more than 20 years of experience in the hair and skin care business. Taylor and Adcock come from Friends Salon/Merle Norman, and Riggs comes to us from Dimensions Salon, all located in Shelbyville.
     

  • Business Briefcase: Oct. 14, 2011

    CUB President Bowling

    honored among alumni

    Elizabethtown Community and Technical College will recognize nine alumni on Monday for their exemplary service to their professions and communities with induction into ECTC’s Hall of Fame.

    Citizens Union Bank President David Bowling, class of 1979, will be among the honorees.

  • WICHE: Plan garlic now for 2012 summer harvest

    For centuries garlic has been enjoyed for its culinary, medicinal and spiritual qualities, including fending off evil spirits and vampires and acting as an anti-bacterial.

    There was evidence of garlic in King Tut’s tomb when it was discovered so obviously the ancient Egyptians were growing it as far back as 2100 B.C. That’s some serious culinary history.

    There are two categories of garlic to consider: Allium sativum, or softneck garlic, and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic.

  • Ag Report: Oct. 14, 2011

    Horses being added

    to Kentucky Proud

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the Kentucky Equine Education Project and the Kentucky Horse Council announced that horses have been added to the Kentucky Proud program.