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Today's News

  • Business Briefcase: June 3, 2011

    Shelby resident selected
    for health disparities program
    Ryan Irvine, a Shelby County resident who is deputy director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness, has been selected to participate in a year-long executive leadership program designed to tackle racial and ethnic disparities in health care.         

  • Regional final: Collins falls just short of state softball tournament

    INDEPENDENCE – Collins' final comeback came up slightly short in the 8th Region final Thursday night.

    The Titans, who had rallied in their final at-bats to win their first two games of the regional tournament, couldn't recapture that magic in the championship game against Walton-Verona.

    Collins fought back from a 3-0 deficit early in the game to tie the score in the fourth inning. However, Jenalee Ginn's 2-out RBI-double to left-center field in the bottom of the fifth inning gave the Bearcats a 4-3 victory at Simon Kenton.

  • News briefs: June 3, 2011

    Hornback appointed

    to regional ag group

    State Senate President David Williams recently appointed Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) to the Agriculture and Rural Development Committee of the Southern Legislative Conference. 

    The SLC’s mission is to foster and encourage intergovernmental cooperation among its 15-member states, and it is the largest regional gathering of state legislators.

  • Arts Briefs: June 3, 2011

    Shelby Artists on Main
    celebrating its 8th anniversary

    Shelby Artists on Main, which has featured local and regional artists at its shop on Main Street in Shelbyville for the past eight years, will celebrate that occasion with a public party at 7 p.m.  on June 11.
    A fundraiser will be held as part of the event, and a Cezanne-style drop-leaf table by artist Rose Flowers, a longtime contributor to the gallery, with four antique “Coke” chairs will be raffled off.

  • Weeds and Things to close June 30

    Weeds and Things, the quirky gift and floral shop in downtown Shelbyville, announced Friday that it would be closing at the end of June.

    In an E-mail letter to customers and business people in Shelbyville, co-owner Rob Canina cited rumors about the business and a story in Friday’s Sentinel-Newsas the foundation for the decision by him and his partner, Chris Pennington, to close the business.

  • Ag Report: June 3, 2011

    SCHS junior to attend

    Farm Bureau program

    Rachel White of Shelby County High School is one of 89 high school juniors from 57 counties chosen to attend Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 26thannual Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders this summer.

  • School board members have hands-on meeting

    The setting for Thursday night’s school board meeting was a little unusual: Instead of board members seated before an audience, board members found themselves writing papers on genetics.

    At the beginning of the meeting, West Middle School teacher Kerri Holder arranged the boardroom like a classroom and seated board members with student participants, complete with colored construction paper and plenty of pens and pencils with which to complete their assignment.

    The objective?

  • WICHE: Powdery mildew in the garden

    Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around, and it is not too terribly picky about where it spreads.

    It likes humid weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started. The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing, pruning and treatment before it spreads.

    Powdery mildew is caused by several different fungi. I won’t bore you with their names because they all act the same way.

  • This little bug-lover holes in just about anywhere

    The Great Crested Flycatcher is the only flycatcher in the Eastern United States that builds its nest in cavities.

    An old woodpecker hole, a natural cavity or a manmade nest box is selected as the home, and it nearly always is decorated with a shed of snakeskin. In fact some call this bird the “Snakeskin Bird.”

    It builds that nest in a bulky mass of twigs, leaves, hair, feathers, bark fibers, rope and other trash, constructed anywhere from 3 to 75 feet above the ground.

  • Q&A: Here’s the scoop on using manure in the garden

     

    Q: I have access to alpaca manure. Can it be used in the garden? Michele