Today's News

  • Rockets romp to 3rd in a row

    The Shelby County girls’ basketball team won its third consecutive game and equaled its victory total from last season on Saturday afternoon.

    Coming off a quick turnaround, following Friday night’s victory at Campbellsville, the Rockets responded with a 44-24 victory over host Carroll County.

  • Titans put the big D on D-ville

    A fabulous first half – particularly on the defensive end – carried the Collins boys’ basketball team to victory Friday night.

    The Titans held visiting Danville to only eight points in the first 16 minutes on their way to a 63-43 victory.

    Collins led, 12-2, at the end of the first quarter and 26-8 at intermission as it won for the fourth time in five games this season.

    Junior forward Dez Marshall scored 16 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, and senior center Brian Stone tallied 12 points for the Titans (4-1).  

  • Newcomer Wallace sparks Rockets

    Bryan Wallace continued to provide an early-season spark for the Shelby County boys’ basketball team, fueling the Rockets’ first victory of the season.

    Wallace, a sophomore guard, scored a team-high 20 points, most of them in the first half, when Shelby built a 17-point lead on its way to a 78-70 victory over visiting Mercer County on Friday night at Mike Casey Gymnasium.

    “The key was we came out with intensity and worked hard,” said Wallace, who was 6-for-14 from the field and 7-of-8 from the free-throw line.  

  • Shelby County School Board: Shelby dropouts now have new way to finish

    Shelby County Public Schools is hoping to jumpstart the careers of students who jumped out of school a little too early.

    The district will begin a pilot program on Jan. 3 that will help students who dropped out of school before graduating finally earn their diplomas.

    This program differs from the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) program in that students actually earn Shelby County diplomas instead of an equivalency.

  • Building Shelby Part 1: New judicial center is no cheap facility

    The new Shelby County Judicial Center is designed to last 100 years, and at a little more than $220,000 per year, taxpayers have to hope that the facility holds up.

    The calculator on that debt service begins Monday, when the first gavel will fall at this 58,000-square-foot, federal-styled, brick facility at the corner of Main and 4th streets in Shelbyville.

  • Building Shelby Part 1: State is building new centers

    Since its judicial center construction program began in 2000, the AOC has had such projects approved for half of the commonwealth’s 120 counties. Many projects have been for new, standalone buildings, but some have been for courthouse additions and renovations.

    Of the 40 projects approved since 2005, only seven were done in counties larger than Shelby. And of those 24 have been completed, and 16 remain in various stages of construction.

    The seven larger projects, their counties, costs, square footage and date of completion are:

  • Crimes against the holiday: Here's one wrap sheet

    This is the time of year when I hear that 4-letter word a lot. It’s awful that has to resonate right in the middle of the holidays, but that seems simply unavoidable, pounding into my head and creating all sorts of awful echoes.
    Whew! Just typing it made me shiver and avert my eyes. Makes me gulp, turn that most embarrassing crimson, taste bile in my throat and, well, feel totally useless. Pardon me a second while I hyperventilate.

  • News briefs: Dec. 14, 2011

    School districts receive bad news
    about $57.5 million educational shortfall

    Local school officials around Kentucky will soon find out how much money they stand to lose in a $57.5 million shortfall to state education funding.
    Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told superintendents in an E-mail Friday that the Kentucky Department of Education would announce mid-year cuts later this month, The State-Journal reported.

  • What we think: Fitness should be focus for law enforcement

    Should we care about the physical fitness of our law enforcement officers?

    You have reacted strongly both in print and on the Web about why that question should or should not receive public scrutiny.

    You have been vocal about whether the mere suggestion that the physical capabilities of the two Shelbyville Police officers who entered into the deadly confrontation with a teenager last month might have been a factor in the way that confrontation unfolded and unfortunately ended.

  • Ethington Autos owners go before licensing group

    The owners of Ethington Auto, already under indictment on 169 counts for failure to process paperwork properly on the sale of autos, now will have to face the Kentucky Motor Vehicle Commission on Thursday.
    Donnie Ethington, 70, of Shelbyville and William Ledford, 84, of Somerset were indicted this past summer. Two of the charges were felonies, for selling or receiving cars with removed or altered VIN numbers, and the rest were all misdemeanors.