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Today's News

  • Titans can’t hold big lead, fall in title tilt

    LAWRENCEBURG – Phillip Conder’s girls played more than 21 minutes of some of, if not their best, basketball of the season Friday night.

    It’s those final 10 minutes or so of the 30th District Tournament championship game, though, that he and his Titans would rather forget.

    That’s because host Anderson County outscored Collins, 26-7, during the final 10:43 to rally for 47-43 victory.

  • Titans’ hot-shooting finish nets district title

    LAWRENCEBURG – About the only problem the Collins boys’ basketball team had with the basket at which it shot during the second half of Friday night’s 30th District Tournament final was cutting down its net. 

    The Titans shot 68.2 percent from the field after intermission to claim the first district title in the brief, 2-year history of the program with a 62-47 victory over host Anderson County.

    Afterward Collins senior center Brian Stone, the first Titan up the ladder, struggled to snip off a strand of the twine.

  • SCHS’ Kessinger takes 5th in 200 IM

    LOUISVILLE – Collin Kessinger’s times didn’t drop as drastically at the state swim meet this year as much as they did last year.

    However, her place still rose.

    Kessinger, a junior at Shelby County High School, finished in fifth place in the finals of the girls' 200-yard individual medley Saturday at the KHSAA Swimming & Diving State Championships at the University of Louisville’s Ralph Wright Natatorium.

  • Some students struggling with Accelerated Academy’s AP courses

    Although Shelby County Public Schools’ officials have been pleased with the first semester of new Accelerated Academy, they also have identified a few areas for improvement.

    In a report to the school board on Thursday, Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith said with proper tweaks, the district would see even more enthusiasm for the program, which began with 62 students in this year’s freshmen classes (37 at Collins, 25 at Shelby County).

  • Beyond the gates of Undulata

    “I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives. I like to see a man who lives in it so that his place will be proud of him.”

    —    Abraham Lincoln

    President Abraham Lincoln’s words hang inside Edward “Hoppy” Bennett’s office and resonate throughout the grounds of Undulata.

    Bennett bought the famous old home at auction in 1994 after it had fallen into some disrepair.

  • Shelby County School Board: MAP scores show disappointing trend

    The Shelby County Board of Education received some disappointing information as the district marches toward the first of its BIG Goals this year.

    The district’s winter Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) test results revealed that the schools have a long way to go to ensure that every student entering middle school next year be on or above grade level in math and reading.

  • Tenants get water, power

    Tenants living in properties owned and maintained by Wood Properties have been getting some good news since late last week.

    "We got our water turned back on Friday, and our power is back on now, too," said Fred Harrington, a renter at 908 Main St. in Shelbyville. "Everybody [at the other locations] has everything turned back on."

    Several properties owned by Wood had lost water and power despite residents having paid their rent, which was supposed to cover all utilities.

  • Hornback’s bill would loosen telecom regs

    If you are one of the ever-dwindling homes with a traditional land telephone line, you may have to start looking for an alternative.

    Senate Bill 135, also referred to as the "AT&T Bill," is scheduled to come up before the Senate next week and appears to have the needed support.

    Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville), the sponsor of the bill, said he has worked closely with the Public Service Commission to make sure its officials agree with the bill and that the residents of the commonwealth will continue to have adequate phone service.

  • In this hot matchup, everyone was a winner

    This was a scene worthy of every clichéyou’ve ever read. Every trite phrase to define tension, intensity and personal fortitude was pulsing through the atmosphere. Every syllable of coach-speak echoed silently from the corners.

    Two teams confronted one another over the scant space of a yard or two, coaches tensely watching nearby, fans crammed into the standing-room-only swelter of a small venue.

  • What we think: Questions abound about Hornback’s bill

    Paul Hornback is in his second full year of representing Shelby County in the state Senate, and he is starting to step into the sometimes squishy purchase of both political position and important decision.
    He also will begin to see that those processes will begin to erode his legislative honeymoon with his constituents, depending upon their perspectives.