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Today's News

  • Shelbyville City Council: City’s stormwater runoff requirements to get updated

    Fresh on the heels of her department’s upgrade to its facility, City Engineer/Public Works Director Jennifer Herrell will present an amended ordinance to the Shelbyville City Council at Thursday’s meeting.

    The ordinance is a requirement of the Kentucky Division of Water, and updates the city’s requirements for the control of construction site stormwater runoff.

    Herrell said this amendment would remove much of the technical data, instead moving that into a manual.

  • MY WORD: Outlet mall would bring problems

    The editorial (“Outlet mall plan will test us all,” May 9) in The Sentinel-News (Shelby County’s local paper) about the proposed outlet mall in Simpsonville (The Outlet Shoppes of Louisville) already seems to support this development as “progress” and implores: “We have to avoid the tragedy of lost opportunity.” How is progress and opportunity defined by building this outlet mall?

  • MY WORD: Special idea from special sisters

    Kate Schaefer has won awards in art. Claire Schaefer has won awards in dance and beauty contests.

    They wish every student had the same opportunities, especially since Claire remembers only one time seeing children with special needs competing in a contest in which she participated.

    Their wish has come true because of their own efforts.

    These two sisters have worked out arrangements with the Shelby County Fair Board to have an art contest and a Miss Sensational Pageant for students identified with disabilities.

  • What we think: The joke of redistricting is on us

    There remain many laps in the race for congress in House District 4, but no matter who wins at the polls on May 22, we get the distinct impression that Shelby Countians are going to lose.
    There are nine candidates – seven Republicans and two Democrats – vying for the seat held for four terms by Republican Geoff Davis, but even newer than those candidates is the presence of Shelby County in a congressional district that has its seat of power in the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati.

  • What we think: Anonymous caller deserves our scorn

    Sophia Sanchez had one of those ideas that we love to praise.
    Ms. Sanchez, a student at Collins High School, decided that as a service project for her JROTC unit that she would set up boxes at each of the polling precincts on Primary Election Day so that voters could donate needed goods to the Shelby County Animal Shelter.

  • News briefs: May 16, 2012

    Bridge work on Washington,

    Zaring Mill may cause delays

     

    Road work is going to hamper motorists trying to navigate portions of Shelby County these next couple of weeks.

    First there is bridge deck restoration and waterproofing going on at the bridge on Washington Street in Shelbyville where it passes over Clear Creek and on Zaring Mill Road where at Clear Creek.

    Both bridges are limited to one lane, and a temporary traffic light has been installed.

  • Bagdad Day holds 20th birthday party to much community enthusiasm

    The sun may have been fickle in Bagdad on Saturday, but the smiles on the faces of those who attended the town's 20th anniversary festival lit up the day all over the small community.

  • Election 2012: District 4 Congress: Tom Wurtz

    Tom Wurtz, a business consultant in Fort Mitchell, is seeking to add a congressional seat to his list of accomplishments.

    Wurtz, 56, a Republican, is a newcomer to the political arena who says he believes his business skills he has developed leading The Sheakley Group in Cincinnati are badly needed in congress.

  • County employees to get 1st raise in 3 years

    County employees will get their first raise in three years, thanks to some adjustments in the proposed county budget for 2013, which on Tuesday passed its first reading by Shelby County Fiscal Court.

    The budget, at $17,531,889, was $99,751 more than the $17,432,138 Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger had proposed in his tentative plan presented to magistrates May 1.

  • Shelbyville Police to crack down on parking, seat-belt violators

    Shelbyville Police say they are about to crack down on those who park their cars illegally and motorists who are not wearing seat belts.

    Officers now are enforcing the 2-hour parking only regulations in the downtown area, and those who don’t comply will be fined.

    “The parking regulation signs have been posted; enforcement will begin immediately,” SPD Community Resource Officer Istvan Kovacs said.

    Vehicles parked in excess of the posted 2-hour limit will be issued a citation.