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Today's News

  • Rockets can’t escape early deficit

    TAYLORSVILLE – The Shelby County softball team had one of its biggest victories of this season against Spencer County.

    The Bears, though, avenged that loss for the second time Monday night with a 7-1 victory over the Rockets in the 30th District Tournament semifinals.

    Shelby County (8-25) beat Spencer County, 4-2, April 3 in Shelbyville before the Bears won the rematch, 4-0, a month later in Taylorsville.

  • Shelbyville City Council: City to increase enforcement on 2-hour parking areas

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty warned those in attendance at Thursday’s Shelbyville City Council meeting that the city is beginning it’s crackdown on downtown parking.

    The 2-hour parking areas have been under ordinance for a long time, Hardesty has said, but most of the signs had either fallen down or were knocked down.

    But, they have now all been replaced, and he said those parking downtown need to make themselves aware.

  • Shelby County School Board: Budget plan: 2012-13 balanced but very tight

    The Shelby County Board of Education will take its first look and vote on the tentative 2012-13 budget during a meeting Thursday, and the news from the federal and state governments only has gotten worse since January, when members first saw a draft of this plan.

    The budget is proposed to be $58.8 million plan, about 5 percent less than the 2010-11 actual expenses, and that’s despite Shelby County being a growth district.

  • VAN STOCKUM: Joseph Hornsby -- An early Shelby Countian Part 3: A chronicle of the early days of Shelby County

    Joseph Hornsby started keeping a chronicle of events in Shelby County in 1798, shortly after his arrival here.

    Chris McManus of Washington, D. C., a direct descendant of Hornsby, arranged a number of years ago for his family to donate this significant chronicle of early Shelby County history to the Filson Historical Society of Louisville.

  • Shelby man gets 20 years in sex case

    A Shelbyville man was sentenced to 20 years in prison Monday for sex crimes against a 9-year-old child.
    Circuit Judge Charles Hickman sentenced Abel V. Gomez, 30, in accordance with what the Shelby County Commonwealth Attorney’s office had recommended, which included not granting him probation.

    Gomez’s attorney, Shelby County Public Advocate Melanie Lowe-Stratton, had told the judge that Gomez was asking for probation so he could go back to Mexico and help his family on their farm.

  • EARLIER: Woman’s death at Lake Shelby likely a ‘horrible accident’

    Fish and Wildlife officials investigating why a woman died at Lake Shelby on May 12 say they don’t expect charges to be filed and that likely this was just a “horrible accident.”

    On Mother’s Day weekend, Amanda Frank, 34, her son, Patrick, 12, and a friend, Shane Jump, all of Louisville, were on a fishing outing near where the lake takes its northern bend toward the bridge at Freedom’s Way when their 15-foot 1982 Skeeter fiberglass boat began to fill up with water.

  • Ethington Auto case rescheduled for November

    The owners of Ethington Auto have been given a new district court date in November to face charges brought against them last summer involving improper paperwork on vehicles, allowing their appeal of losing their business license to be processed first.

    Donnie Ethington, of Shelbyville, 71, and William Ledford, 85, were charged with 169 counts for failure to process paperwork properly on the sale of autos, and they will head back to district court at 1 p.m. Nov. 2 for their final pre-trial conference. The trial is set for 9 a.m. Nov. 15,

  • Porn case postponed as bargain continues

    A Lawrenceburg man who told police he had “sexual desires for children” was given a new court date in Shelby Circuit Court on Monday

    Mark Hawks, 50, had his case rescheduled from last month to June 19 because prosecutors still were working on negotiating a plea offer on child pornography charges.

    Shelby Circuit Judge Charles Hickman said that he did not intend to let the case go very much longer without being resolved.

  • On the other side of the questions

    During the past couple of weeks, I have found myself standing before several of you talking about what we do and how we try to do it.
    And, as I tell any group to which I speak, I make my living by typing, not talking. That was a decision I made in college, when I realized that my flat Kentucky twang and wild blonde hair did not translate smoothly on television, thus ending my dream of being the next Cawood Ledford – with hair – which was after I realized pro sports were out, too.

  • What we think: Voters must care about Election Day

    With the Primary Election now all counted and complete, most of our eyes will be affixed on the names that will appear at the top of the ballot in November. We don’t doubt Barack Obama and Mitt Romney will have a spirited slugfest as they try to woo Kentucky’s voters and electoral votes.

    But our greater focus this fall will be on the undercard of their heavyweight bout, the faces in the races to see who will emerge from our counties and neighborhoods to lead decision-making in our community for the next two to four years.