.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Titans’ big start is the beginning of the end for Rockets

    Collins girls’ basketball coach Phillip Conder couldn’t have asked for a better start for his team Friday night.

    And although he would’ve liked a better finish, he wasn’t complaining after his Titans topped host Shelby County, 51-18, in Mike Casey Gymnasium.

    Buoyed by its full-court press Collins scored the first eight points – and 16 of the first 18 – on its way to a 20-4 lead at the end of the first quarter, a 28-point halftime advantage and a 33-point victory.

  • Rockets surprise early but Titans pull away late

    The Shelby County boys’ basketball team gave Collins all it wanted - and then some - for the first 25 minutes of their match-up Friday night.

    The Titans, though, dominated the final 23 minutes, taking advantage of their height inside, as they beat the Rockets, 82-65, at Mike Casey Gymnasium.

    After Shelby County took a 7-point lead – its largest of the game – early in the second half, Collins outscored the Rockets, 28-2, during the next 7½ minutes.

  • Mail delivery to slow down

    The United States Postal Service appears to be ready to take hold of the snail mail moniker.

    The USPS officially filled documents this week to request an opinion from the Postal Regulatory Commission on changing first-class mail requirements. However, the commission's opinion is non-binding.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Raises for firefighters, police get 1st approvals

    The Shelbyville City Council quickly wrapped up a short agenda during its regular meeting Thursday at city hall, approving unanimously the first reading of ordinances that will raise the pays scales by 1.5 percent for city police and firefighters.

    Earlier this year the city approved a cost-of-living increase for all other city employees.

    Mayor Tom Hardesty also informed the council that the city was close to finding a new city attorney.

    Frank Chuppe, who has been the city attorney for 15 years, is retiring at the end of the year.

  • How about a little faith for the holidays?

    For years, when asked what I wanted for a Christmas gift, I offered the same canned but heartfelt item:
    Peace on earth and good will toward men.

    Could there be a better present than wanting the world to reach its serene and sincere summit? I mean, what could compare? A new Countess Mara (look it up) or a sleeve of Titleists or one of those hot cars so many folks in commercials seem to receive?

    No, I thought nothing under the tree could be greater – until now.

  • What we think: Review or repeal shock probation

    Why is shock probation part of the judicial landscape in Kentucky?

    There are only seven states that have such a program, which allow judges to release from prison convicted criminals – many of them felons – simply because they have faced the “shock” of life in a cell.

    Why does Kentucky’s having shock probation seem to be such a disservice to law enforcement, prosecutors and the judicial process in general?

  • NEIHOF: Giving gifts that last

    There is a scene in the movie Fred Clausin which Fred (played by Vince Vaughn) is responsible for determining which child makes the Nice List or which child makes the Naughty List. The older brother of Santa Claus tires of the situation and the choice process, so he stamps each and every child as Nice, meaning each and every child receives what he or she wants.

    I must be Fred Claus.

  • MY WORD: Think, shop and buy in Shelby County

    When dollars are spent in Shelby County, they can in turn be invested locally, raising the overall level of economic activity, paying more salaries and building the local tax base. This recirculation of money leads to an increase of economic activity, with the degree of expanse entirely dependent on the percentage of money spent locally.

    Buying away from home means lost revenue for local businesses and your tax dollars going to support some other community. I refer to the lost of potential-local retail sales, as “retail leakage.”

  • Fast asks for shock probation

    Joshua Fast of Crestwood, sentenced in June to second-degree burglary and reckless homicide, has asked to be considered for shock probation.

    Shelby County Circuit Judge Charles Hickman sentenced Fast in June to 10 years in prison, 5 years for the homicide charge and 5 years for the burglary, for his participation in the events surrounding the shooting death of David Fletcher of Shelbyville in October 2008.

  • Betty Thom: 1936-2011

    A stunning death has taken the life of a well-known musician and folk singer who lived near Simpsonville.

    Betty Thom, one of the original founding members of the folk/bluegrass group, The Cumberlands, passed away in her sleep, said her husband of 55 years, Harold Thom.

    “She was the most wonderful, loving, compassionate, kind, brilliant lady,” he said. “She was one in a billion.”