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Today's News

  • Noonan’s dinger gives Shelby the win

    LOUISVILLE – Kody Noonan couldn’t have picked a better moment to hit the first home run of the season for the Shelby County baseball team.

    His three-run homer in the top of the seventh inning propelled the Rockets to a 6-5 victory over host Fairdale on Monday afternoon.

    “It couldn’t have come at a better time,” said Noonan, who went 3-for-4 with five RBIs.

  • Spring break doesn’t snap Titans’ winning streak

    While the rest of the Collins student body is on spring vacation, the school’s baseball team is having a stay-cation.

    Collins is playing five games this week, including four at home. The Titans won the first of those home games Tuesday afternoon, beating Elizabethtown 5-2 less than 24 hours after blanking host Meade County, 6-0, Monday night on the strength of junior Austin Perry’s no-hitter.

  • Collins’ Perry no-hits Meade

    Austin Perry pitched a no-hitter Monday night to lead the Collins baseball team to a 6-0 victory at Meade County.

    “He had complete command of his pitches, [an] outstanding performance,” Collins Coach Roy Bailey said.

    Perry, a junior right-hander struck out seven – throwing 18 first-pitch strikes.

    “I just tried to locate and hit my spots, keep it away from them,” he said. “I threw a lot of two-seam fastballs, ran the four-seam away from them and worked the slider.”

  • Shelby’s new equine sale could replace big event

    Jimmy Robertson recognized a serious gap in the market, and now he thinks his new company and Shelbyville can fill it perfectly.

    With the famed auction house Tattersalls closing its doors in Lexington and the retirement of Ed and Suzie Teater, who handled its auctions, Robertson, a longtime Saddlebred breeder and trainer, said he started thinking. The auctions had become largely Saddlebred during the past few years, with fewer and fewer Standardbreds being offered at the Teaters’ auctions.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Wesley Apartments are ‘meeting code’

    As the Shelbyville City Council wrapped a brief meeting on Thursday, council member Frank Page inquired about the condemned Wesley Apartments on the corner of U.S. 60 and Freedom’s Way on the west end of the city.

    “Have we heard anything from code enforcement on the Wesley Apartments?” he asked Mayor Tom Hardesty.

    The city annexed the property last month and at the time had vowed to clean it up in response to an editorial that ran in The Sentinel-Newscalling for the abandoned buildings to be taken down.

  • Give me a little hair, long beautiful hair

    My son walked into the kitchen the other day, dressed for an evening event, and asked me proudly, “Do you like how I have my hair organized?”

    Although he is gifted in language arts, he didn’t quite understand why I immediately laughed, thinking perhaps that his “organization” wasn’t all that great.

    Truth is, he has extremely soft, thick hair – think of something that you would use to brush clean a fine fabric or even your own hair – and it had grown beyond its “organizational” best.

  • We congratulate: Martinrea’s rebound

    Those employment figures at Martinrea Heavy Stamping are surely something to brag about. Adding 150 jobs to a hanging-by-a-thread workforce deserves applause from all of us.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court certainly offered its good wishes last week, and we join the magistrates in saying thank you to the company and to Ford Motor Company for its continuing and growing commitment to Shelby County.

  • This Shelby Countian is 100 years young

    Ruth Marshall Clemmons of Shelbyville turned 100 years old on Monday.

    Born April 9, 1912, she held her birthday celebration Saturday at Citizens Union Bank’s community room, where more than 100 people gathered to honor her, said her daughter, Rebecca Tingle.

    “[Sen.] Paul Hornback came and presented her with a Kentucky Colonel’s certificate,” she said.

  • Mosquitoes to be bigger pests this year

    State officials are worried about the effect of a mosquito outbreak on Kentucky’s equine population, so much so that the commissioner of agriculture has issued a warning to horse owners to vaccinate their animals against the West Nile virus.

    “While we do not wish to cause unnecessary alarm, we are concerned about the equine population’s vulnerability to this potentially deadly disease,” Commission James Comer said in a press statement released last week.

  • Federal funding could be in danger for Job Corps

    Funding for some Job Corps centers across the nation – including the Whitney M. Young center in Simpsonville – could be cut if a recent speech by the secretary of labor is any indication.
     

    In a March 21 speech to the Committee on Education and the Workforce, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis said that the 2013 federal budget proposes reforms to improve the Job Corps program, but she added that while most centers meet program standards, some have been consistently low performing for years.