.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Rubles ask city to annex property

    The City of Shelbyville could grow by more than 70 acres in next to no time.

    Fresh on the heels of voting to annex the property where Bluegrass Bowling Center currently sits, the Shelbyville City Council soon will be voting on another annexation, this time on the northwest side of Shelbyville.

    Tom and Allen Ruble have sent a letter to the city asking for annexation of about 70 acres zoned agricultural that sits just west of the Shelbyville Bypass and south of Harrington Mill Road.

  • The Civil War in Shelby County

    Before the first shots of the Civil War were fired 150 years ago - on April 12, 1861 - it was already clear that Kentucky would play an important role in shaping both the Confederate and Union sides.

    A border state like no other, Kentucky's legislature struggled to choose a side, finally settling with the Union, much to the delight of President Abraham Lincoln, a native.

  • Noted author to speak at library

    Gurney Norman will be the guest author 6-7 p.m. Thursday for a third in the series of “Spend an Evening with....” at the Shelby County Public Library.

    He is a charter member of the faculty of the Hindman Settlement School’s Writers Workshop and continues to serve as a senior writer in residence for that annual event.

  • What we think: Let’s just fix the sidewalks

    We have followed with interest these past few weeks as a group of downtown-area property owners in Shelbyville have joined forces in the oldest and most common goal that many of us ever seek to undertake: fighting city hall.

  • Historical footnotes of Squire Boone, Col. John Floyd

    Since the publication of – in both newspaper and book formats – my columns on Squire Boone, whose Painted Stone Station along Clear Creek was the forerunner of present-day Shelbyville, I have received additional information relating to his life and times.

    You may recall that, on Sept. 13, 1781, settlers fleeing Painted Stone for the relative safety of Linn’s Station were attached viciously by Indians in what has been described as “The Long Run Massacre.”

  • Japan fundraiser leaves organizer ‘disappointed’

    The one-woman whirlwind to generate some money to aid earthquake-savaged Japan had her own world shaken a bit on Saturday.

    The bake sale Mallory Taylor organized at the Waldridge Center generated only light traffic and a few hundred dollars worth of donations.

    “I was a little disappointed,” she said. “I went home and cried.”

    Taylor had started a campaign to raise money to donate through the American Red Cross.

  • Soldiers finally honored in ‘hallowed ground’

    On a warm, crystal clear, almost muggy spring day – quite different from the day when they died – 22 long-forgotten African-American soldiers were laid to proper rest in a skillfully created memorial alongside U.S. 60 near Simpsonville.

    A crowd of perhaps 150 was on hand Sunday as project manager Jerry Miller and a group of dignitaries celebrated the final resting of the member of the 5th U.S. Colored Cavalry who died in ambush by Confederate guerillas as they drove cattle to Louisville in January 1865.

  • How high was the water in Shelby County on Tuesday?

    The nearly 24 hours of consistent rain that poured down onto Shelby County from Monday to Tuesday morning caused plenty of localized flooding and closed some roads – and also triggered an emergency overflow at the Guist Creek dam that hasn’t happened in years.

    National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Jarvis said that from 7 a.m. Monday to 7 a.m. Tuesday, Shelbyville received 4.07 inches of rain, and some parts of the county near the Oldham/Shelby County line were at about 3.8 inches.

  • Looking Back: April 8, 2011

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

  • Look high in the trees to spot this spring singer

    It’s the Yellow-Throated Warbler’s time of the year around here.

    This bird arrives from its wintering grounds in the central to southern United States very early for a warbler species in Kentucky.

    In fact, you can start hearing their unique song in late March to early April.

    This song is described as teeeew-teeew-teew-tew-tew-tew-twi as it runs down the scale and grows fainter and fainter, ending in an abrupt higher note.

    But even if you hear this bird, don’t be surprised if you have trouble finding it in the branches.